Posts Tagged ‘science fiction author’

Check out a brand new series on the Lachesis Publishing blog called AUTHOR TO AUTHOR:

David Lee Summers interviews best-selling science fiction and horror author Gini Koch, author of the hugely popular cross-genre science-fiction/paranormal/romance/comedy ALIEN series.

DLS: You’ve written under several pseudonyms including Anita Ensal, Jemma Chase, A.E. Stanton, and J.C. Koch. You’re clearly not hiding your identity when you use a pseudonym. What do you see as their purpose? Authors often build brands around their names. Do you build a new brand identity for each pseudonym or do you see these as subsidiaries of the Gini Koch brand?

GK: I write under pen names because my voice changes. I believe that your name is your promise to your readers. As Gini Koch, I write fast, fresh, and funny fiction. So, if you pick up something from Gini Koch, you expect to laugh a couple of times at least. But being funny is hard work and I don’t feel like doing that all the time. So my other pen names allow me to write in any way I want, changing my voice along the way, which is a lot more fun for me.

I write horror as J.C. Koch, I write SF/F/Paranormal as Anita Ensal and Jemma Chase, and I write novels set in the Old West and dystopian future fiction with an Old West flair as A.E. Stanton. G.J. Koch is the closest to Gini Koch – that’s the name I write the Alexander Outland series under. I think G.J. is a little funnier than Gini, but that’s kind of for readers to decide.

I look at the other pen names as subsidiaries, yes, because they’re all me, and they’re all coming from my mind. Most of the time these days I byline anything from the other names as Gini Koch writing as (say) J.C. Koch. It lets my readers know it’s me, but me writing in “that” voice, so they know more what to expect.

DLS: Who was your greatest writer influence/inspiration when you started?  What are some books of theirs you would recommend?

GK: I firmly feel that anything you’ve ever read will influence you – good, bad, or indifferent. However, I’d say that the writer who influenced me the most when I started writing was Terry Pratchett, and I’d recommend any and all of his Discworld novels.

Other influences would be O. Henry, Arthur Conan Doyle, Madeleine L’Engle, Dave Barry, P.J. O’Rourke, Clifford D. Simak, Robert Silverberg, and, possibly most of all, Robert Benchley. I’m sure the moment I send this I’ll remember other authors who were inspirations, but these will do for now.

DLS: The Alien/Katherine “Kitty” Kat series is now up to fourteen books with the release of Alien Nation.  Obviously sales factor into keeping a series going, but did you write the early novels with the idea that this could be a long-running series?  Will the series run indefinitely or is there a plan for it to end after a certain number of books?  Do you have an ending in mind if the series should come to a conclusion?

GK: I see almost all story ideas as series, and some of them I can see running for a really long time. When I’m writing an Alien novel, I normally “see” the next few books ahead. So, for example, when I was writing Book 5/Alien Diplomacy, I could “see” Alien vs. Alien, Alien in the House, and Alien Research. I might not know what’s going into which book, particularly smaller subplots and supporting characters, but I know where the series overall is going.

I don’t know that I can honestly say that I planned for such a long-running series, though I’m thrilled that’s been the case. In the first few books, I was aiming for Book 10/Universal Alien. All the books were, for me, aiming for that novel. Once that was done, now all the books are aiming for Book 20. So, hopefully we’ll get there. I’m currently contracted through Book 17, so here’s hoping!

DLS: You’re not only a prolific novelist, but a prolific short story writer.  Aside from writing to a shorter length, do you approach the two forms differently?  If so, how?  Do you think all writers should hone both skill sets?  Why or why not?

GK: I actually do approach short stories differently from novels. I’m an extreme linear writer. I start with the title, then the first line, and when I get to the end…I stop. I don’t outline novels because if I did, if I knew everything that was going to happen, then I wouldn’t bother writing it, I’d already know and have lost interest. So, if something surprises you in one of my novels, good, because it surprised me, first.

For short stories, however, I outline those in my head. I see what I want happening, and then I write. Usually the story changes a bit from my internal outline, but I know what’s going to happen. For whatever reason, knowing how a short will end doesn’t ruin the surprise for me. This is probably because I’m a natural novelist – it’s easy for me to write novel length. But short stories are much harder for me, so I plan them out much more. So far, it seems to be working.

I do feel that, as an author, you should learn to write in as many lengths and genres and styles as you can manage. It increases your odds of selling. But this is an artistic pursuit, and everyone does their art their own way, which is as it should be.

DLS: What do you see as the role of social media in an author’s marketing repertoire? What social media platforms do you prefer?

GK: Right now social media is where it’s at. It’s free, but it costs your time, which is not free. However, it’s a great way to meet and interact with readers and fans, and, frankly, as with having a website and a blog, being on Facebook and/or Twitter are kind of the baseline.

I like Facebook and Twitter a lot, am still basically useless at Instagram, though I keep on trying here and there, and I love Pinterest, but boy, is that the time suck if you’re not careful. But it’s so much fun, too. And I can show off my covers, do boards where I show who I think the characters look like or could play them in that movie/TV show that, sadly currently, only exists in my mind, share jokes, and then some.

DLS: In addition to social media, you put a lot of effort into getting out to conventions and festivals, and you often have an amazing dealer’s table set up.  You’re an author with a big publisher and books in the stores. Why do you go the extra mile to have this kind of presence?

GK: Because you don’t stay an author with a big publisher and books in stores unless you’re out there, pressing the flesh, so to speak. My personal viewpoint is that until you’re a household name – as in, if you go to any grocery store and say your name, people would know who you are even if they don’t read – you’d better be working. And part of the work that goes into being a successful author is going to live events, meeting readers, connecting with fans, speaking, sharing your personality, and so forth.

I happen to enjoy people – unlike what seems like three-quarters of the authors out there, I’m not an introvert – and I enjoy going to events. I love running the yap, I love meeting people, I love sharing my books with new readers and discussing plot points and characters with existing fans, and so on. So going to live events is work that I truly enjoy. But even if I hated it, I’d still do it, because it dramatically affects my sales and my readership, always in a positive way.

DLS: Tell us a little about Alien Nation. What else can we look forward to in the coming months from Gini Koch (or any of your other “secret” identities for that matter)?

Well, Alien Nation is about what happens when word of how well Earth’s repelled interstellar bad guys spreads, and many alien races head for our planet, looking for help from the person who’s been saving the day for a long time now – Kitty. In addition to the usual hijinks for Kitty & Company, we also see the end of some major villains, which was nice for me and the characters. Well, not those villains, but everyone else.

Alien Education/Book 15, releases May 2, and Aliens Abroad/Book 16, releases in December. I’m also planning to have The Alien Collection, which will be a collection of all my Alien series short stories, both previously published and some new, out this year, as well as a collection of my short horror stories, writing as J.C. Koch. I’ll be in several anthologies – Unidentified Funny Objects 6 from UFO Press, Submerged and All Hail Our Robot Overlords! both from Zombies Need Brains, and, finally, the long-delayed MECH: Age of Steel, again writing as J.C. Koch, from Ragnarok. Alexander Outland: Space Pirate, writing as G.J. Koch, gets a mass market re-release in June, which is pretty exciting. I’ll also have an audio release, The Legend of Belladonna Part One: Natural Born Outlaws, writing as A.E. Stanton, coming from Graphic Audio. So, lots ahead for 2017 and beyond!

Gini Koch writes the fast, fresh and funny Alien/Katherine “Kitty” Katt series for DAW Books, the Necropolis Enforcement Files series, and the Martian Alliance Chronicles series. Touched by an Alien, Book 1 in the Alien series, was named by Booklist as one of the Top Ten Adult SF/F novels of 2010. Alien in the House, Book 7 in her long-running Alien series, won the RT Book Reviews Reviewer’s Choice Award as the Best Futuristic Romance of 2013. Alien Nation, released in December 2016 and won the Preditors and Editors Readers’ Poll for Best SF/F Novel of 2016. Book 15, Alien Education, will release in May 2017, with Book 16, Aliens Abroad, coming December 2017.

As G.J. Koch she writes the Alexander Outland series and she’s made the most of multiple personality disorder by writing under a variety of other pen names as well, including Anita Ensal, Jemma Chase, A.E. Stanton, and J.C. Koch.

Gini also has stories featured in a variety of excellent anthologies, available now and upcoming, writing as Gini Koch, Anita Ensal, Jemma Chase, and J.C. Koch. Writing as A.E. Stanton, she will have an audio release, Natural Born Outlaws: The Legend of Belladonna Part 1, coming from Graphic Audio in 2017.

Gini is an in-demand speaker who panels regularly at San Diego Comic-Con, Phoenix Comicon, and the Tucson Festival of Books, among others. She’s also been part of the faculty for the San Diego State University Writers Conference, Jambalaya Con, the Desert Dreams Writers Conference, and the James River Writers Conference, among others.

Prior to becoming a full time author, Gini spent over 25 years in marketing and advertising, first in small- to mid-sized direct marketing firms in Los Angeles, and then with IBM, and she was a social media maven before it was cool.

Reach her here: www.ginikoch.com, faceboook, and twitter

David Lee Summers. David is the author of more than thirty sci-fi and horror fiction novels and short stories including his latest horror novel THE ASTRONOMER’S CRYPT for Lachesis Publishing. Connect with David Lee Summers. online via facebook and twitter, and check out his web site.

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Prolific Fantasy and Sci-Fi Author Robert E. Vardeman

Robert E. Vardeman is the author of more than 100 fantasy and science fiction novels, as well as numerous westerns under various pen names (Jackson Lowry, Karl Lassiter). He’s written gaming tie-in novels such as Dark Legacy for the Magic: The Gathering series and he wrote the Star Trek novels The Klingon Gambit and Mutiny on the Enterprise.  He was nominated for the prestigious Hugo Award in 1972 and he named Albuquerque’s science fiction convention Bubonicon.  The convention is named because even to this day, there are occasional cases of Bubonic Plague in the area.  Fortunately, it’s easily treated by modern antibiotics!

Not only has Bob Vardeman succeeded with traditional, mainstream publishing but he has a long track record of working with small presses and even self-publishing.  His short story collection Stories from Desert Bob’s Reptile Ranch which spans more than thirty years of writing was published by Popcorn Press. I’ve been honored to be featured in a few anthologies with him, including the forthcoming Straight Outta Tombstone anthology from Baen Books.

Bob is a longtime resident of Albuquerque, New Mexico, who graduated from the University of New Mexico with a B.S. in physics and an M.S. in materials engineering. He worked for Sandia National Laboratories in the Solid State Physics Research Department before becoming a full time writer.  I caught up with Bob at this year’s Bubonicon in Albuquerque.

DLS: As I understand, you started out working in the Solid State Physics Research Department at Sandia National Labs before becoming a writer. How has your background in physics and materials science influenced your writing?

REV: While we call it science fiction, what we enjoy most is actually technology fiction–how science affects our lives (and our characters’ lives).  Science moves so fast these days, other than trying to avoid simple mistakes, what I learned back in the days of yore is outdated.  Bell’s Inequality, which changed so much, came 15 years after I quit working at Sandia.  Nano tech meant ICs then. Hubble and soon Webb space telescopes open the universe to dark matter and energy.  I read about new discoveries but mostly I don’t understand them.  Instead, I try to put it all into a technology framework and figure out what the effect will be on our lives.

DLS: How did you get started writing? When you started writing for fanzines, did you have an idea that you wanted to be a professional author?

REV: I’m one of the exceptions to the “I always wanted to write” rule.  I never did.  I wanted to be a nuclear physicist and more or less ended up there, though X-rays and RTGs were as close as I got.  I had a few months between quitting Sandia and going to UC Berkeley where I had been accepted to work on a PhD (in ceramic engineering) when I visited my good buddy Geo. Proctor.  Geo. was a reporter for the Dallas Morning News, had a couple novels and short stories printed and had always wanted to be a writer.  He suggested we coauthor a story.  Why not?  We did, it sold. (and we never got paid–the magazine folded before publication).  Over the years this story sold twice more with the same result.  Ironically, the title of the story was “A Killing In the Market.”  I enjoyed the process, wrote a fantasy proposal and sent it out.  It sold.  I was faced with finishing the book or going to Berkeley, so I postponed school by a half year.  In that time I sold two more novels and decided this was more fun than designing materials for rocket throat liners.  As it turned out, this was a good decision on another front.  The prof who would have been my adviser died of cancer 2 years after I would have begun.  Such a tragedy easily could have derailed my dissertation, research and career.

DLS: You’ve written under several pseudonyms including Karl Lassiter and Jackson Lowry for westerns, your science fiction has appeared under your own name as well as F.J. Hale and Edward S. Hudson, and I could go on.  Authors often build brands around their names.  Why have so many pseudonyms?  What kind of work do you put into building a brand for each new pseudonym?

REV: The sf pen names came about to keep from competing with myself.  One month I had three titles, out, two fantasy and an sf book.  Publishers loathe such self-competition.  The shift in western pen name from Karl Lassiter to Jackson Lowry came about for the same reason.  When I switched publishers, the new one insisted on a different name to keep from supposed promotion of titles from a competing publisher.  In a way, this was good.  Lassiter did more epic, long form novels while Lowry does short stories, lighter westerns and weird westerns.

DLS: Not only do you have several pseudonyms, but you’ve run the gamut from publishing with New York houses to publishing with small presses to self-publishing.  Why work with such a range of publishers?

REV: It took me a while to figure out that I would be terrible doing repetitive assembly line work.  After a few minutes, I’d be changing how Part A fitted into Part B.  Keeping with one genre (and publisher) is like that.  New challenges, new ideas, “what if” always beckons and not necessarily in the same field.  I am prolific and varied ideas flow constantly (I am aware of the difference between constant and continuous, alas–the ideas flow constantly).  It takes a lot of ink and electrons to keep up.

DLS: Tell us about the Empires of Steam and Rust series. I thought this was an especially innovative approach to self-publishing where several authors write in a single world and help each other market their works.  How can we learn more about the books in the series?

REV: Shared worlds aren’t too uncommon, but I decided on a different approach.  The basic steampunk framework could be applied in myriad ways–all suggesting myriad authors could contribute.  The idea of “holes” into a world consumed by rust gave a world lacking in oxygen and the possibility of invasion from (and into) it.  Rather than being the editor for all this, I let trusted authors use the framework to tell stories in their own way and bring their readers to the world.  Hopefully that story interests their readers to look at other writers working in the same framework.  Each author is responsible for story, editing, publishing, cover, marketing, everything.  And the individual author collects 100% of the revenue from their own work.  No charge for use of the world.  Entries so far have been strong and interesting and varied.  I look forward to writing more myself in the world and hope other authors ask if they might join the fun (send me an email to inquire).

DLS: Your career started before we’d heard of things like Twitter and Facebook.  How has the world of book marketing changed now that social media has come on the scene?  How do you fold social media into your own book marketing campaigns?

REV: I coined the term VIPub a few years ago. Vertically Integrated Publishing.  Indie authors have to do it all, think up the idea, write the story, edit it, get a cover, publish and promote. It all rests on the author’s shoulders.  This is overwhelming if you try to do whatever is currently hot in social media since it is a moving target and changes in 6 months (or less).  In a talk David Morrell said 10% of a writer’s time ought to be spent on promotion.  The question arises as to how to allocate that time.  From all the possibilities, I say pick three that interest you most.  Twitter or Facebook or blogs or Instagram or…whatever else is out there.  I have a website I update periodically (www.cenotaphroad.com) and an online store (www.robertevardeman.com).  I do post fun stuff on facebook every day and link it with Twitter.  I have let blog writing lag since I can’t do it all.  One element that is the author’s and no one else’s is a mailing list.  Self-selected fans are the greatest.  (Sign up for mine via my website or online store)  I only send out the n/l when a new book is available or other publishing info comes to light.  I don’t like getting inundated so hold down frequency to make each one special (and give special offers of free books, etc)

DLS: What can we look forward to in the coming months from Robert E. Vardeman, or your other identities for that matter?

REV: One novella I am especially excited about is “Jupiter Convergence” in the new anthology Rockets Red Glare.    A weird western short story, “The Sixth World”, is forthcoming in the Baen anthology Straight Outta Tombstone.  The final volume in a Jackson Lowry weird western trilogy, Punished, is due out in November (#3: Bayou Voodoo joins #1: Undead and #2: Navajo Witches).  I am returning to work on an sf book with a different take on first contact and have a major project mapped out set on the moons of Jupiter.  And when I get a chance, I have a really strange detective novel in synopsis.  Final mention is one of my pen names, Dana Fox.  Burning Man Anomaly is joined by a 3-author follow-up Aztec Automaton Anomaly with a 3rd title being sketched out now set in a haunted 1930’s Texas luxury hotel slated for release in 2017.

Connect with Robert E Vardeman online via his website, on facebook and on Twitter.

Connect with David Lee Summers. online via facebook and twitter, and check out his web site.

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God gave me three gifts of inspiration in life and literature.

Image: www.newsweek.com

I was 24 years old Nov 6th 1988, standing in an operating room as doctors performed an emergency c-section on my wife. My son was dying in her womb. My son was dying. I stood there in shock and dismay, how could this be happening? I watched the surgeon cut into my bride, move organs and then reach into her abdomen and delicately pull out a small struggling life strangled by an umbilical cord. My son’s body was blue, he wasn’t crying. They freed him and his body soon took on a healthy pink color. My son, Thomas Michael, my boy had arrived, earlier than expected and seemingly no worse for the dramatic entrance. Things seemed normal for at first but Tom soon had developed breathing issues, his lungs weren’t developed properly and he was sick.

I listened in shock as the doctor explained Highland Membrane Disease, fluid buildup and under-developed lungs and a series of other issues afflicting my son. My wife had given birth with pneumonia and was having her own health issues. I remember her tears as other moms were able to hold their babies, and  she couldn’t. We waited for several hours while the doctors were tending to Tom. My father stayed by our side offering his support and encouragement, he was the rock we both leaned on. A doctor finally came and told us they couldn’t help and Tom had to be sent to Children’s Hospital and placed on a respirator. Twenty minutes later I watched my son, attached to machines, being loaded into an ambulance and transferred into Boston from the small suburban hospital. The doctors would call me tomorrow. I stood there in shock, as the ambulance drove away carrying my son, my father literally holding me up as my whole world just imploded.

I looked at my dad, lost and hopeless, “Dad, what do I do? I can’t fight this battle. Why? Why my boy?”

My father hugged me, his face wet with his own tears, “God is watching over him now, Greg. You need to take all your strength and stand tall, for that woman up there and your boy. You need to grow up fast, son. You need to keep it together for your family. You told me once how strong you are, call upon it now and be strong for all of them.”

I awoke the next morning to the ringing phone at 5:30AM, I felt ill as I picked it up. It was Children’s Hospital, Tom had had a rough night but was holding his own for now but they couldn’t make any promises and I should prepare my wife for the worst. I hung up the phone, took a breath and looked at the cross hanging on our bedroom wall, “Don’t you take my boy, you can’t have him!” I’ d never sworn or threatened God before, but I let loose a string of blasphemies I’d only used on people facing me in a street brawl. He wasn’t going to die and I wasn’t going to tell my wife about the phone call from the hospital.

I got in my truck and I drove to Boston. I was escorted to a small incubator-like unit, inside was my son, hooked up to machines to do his breathing and to help cleanse his blood. His face was swollen and yellow, nothing like the child I saw the night before. THE nurses left me alone; I couldn’t touch my son I could only stare through the glass.

“Thomas, it’s your dad. I know you can hear me, son. Fight, do you hear me! You fight and you live. Don’t go with the Angels, you stay here, with me. I don’t want to lose you, do you understand? Mom and Dad love you so please don’t leave, you just got here. You just got here.” I felt my tears, “Don’t leave me son.” I sat in silence for three hours, my hand touching the glass, watching my boy, willing him to live. Imagining my strength flowing from me, through the glass barrier and into his frail, tiny body. I repeated the mental image every time I saw him, it didn’t matter who I was with or who was around and I didn’t care what anyone thought, each day he lived was a gift and a victory. And if he needed my life to survive he could have it.

Thomas made a miraculous recovery and is part of a Children’s Hospital medical journal, he shouldn’t have lived, but he did, he beat the odds and fought the ultimate fight, the first month of his existence; the battle for his life. Tom is 27 years old now, a remarkable young man with tenacity and a will to do things his way. That tenacity has caused some friction but no matter what his trial, he always finds a way to make things work out in the end, he never seems to give up on anything or anyone. In the end he finds a way to fight through.

When I find myself going through a rough patch, I remember a frightened young father staring through a glass barrier at a new life and urging that life to fight on and beat the odds. Within those memories I find the strength to rise up and keep pushing forward. My battles and issues have never been as severe as the one he fought and won over 27 years ago. Whether I’m struggling with a chapter in a novel, writing a blog or facing a financial or life hardship I look over at my son and see that twinkle in his eye or that crooked smile he inherited from his dad and I know I can get through. Tom was the one who pushed me to submit my first book and write the follow up. He inspired and motivated me to keep working on my novels when nobody seemed interested in a half-alien private detective. He gave me the confidence and the gift of his insight on the second and third book in the Hybrid series serving as critic and creative collaborator. Tom just didn’t influence my writing he is the spark that fanned the creative flame. A flame that would never have existed if he’d lost his fight so many years ago. He is the best son a father could ever hope to have.

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Three years ago my youngest daughter, Christie, at the age of eleven, decided she wanted to try out for an out of town swim team. I’d coached her in basketball and softball in open town leagues but this was something different.  I watched her first competitive meet from the upper balcony at Milford High School, as my baby girl stood waiting for her event with sport swim wear, a racing cap and tinted goggles.  The feeling of dread weighed in my gut like I’d just eaten a cinder block as she stepped upon the diving block against other swimmers. For the first time, I wasn’t there coaching her, I couldn’t walk up to her and give her advice or encouragement, she was on her own.

The starting horn sounded and the race was on . . . everyone around me screamed and cheered, I watched in muted silence willing her on in my mind, hands balled into tight fists. It was the longest 25 yards in my life. But she finished and won her heat. It was a long year of ups and downs for her and a great deal of frustration but she grew into the sport and more importantly developed new friendships. At the awards banquet she was awarded the most improved swimmer, a trophy she has in her bedroom to this day. She’s still a competitive swimmer and will be on the High School league this fall. I’ve watched her develop into a strong competitor and have seen her conquer her insecurity and lack of self-confidence. She now believes in herself and the difference in her personality is a wonderful thing to behold. Gone is the need to be just like her big sister rather she yearns to be “Christie.”

My youngest has reminded me that the road isn’t always easy in life but those who stay true to themselves and don’t go with the crowd will prosper in the long run. She found a place for herself; it was different from herr friend’s passions in dancing and boys, it was in the pool training and competing, working to shave off that fraction of a second and master a smooth flip turn. I’ve taken that lesson and applied it in my own writing. I’m not going to write like everyone else, I’m going to write about what I want and express how I feel. My political blogs have earned me a great deal of hate mail because I call a spade a spade. I won’t ever apologize for my morals or ethics or my freedom to express them and I won’t bow to political correctness. I did for a while and took the easier choice, it gave me less headaches but I let myself  be silenced. Life isn’t about taking the easy road it’s about making the hard choices, following your passions and not following the herd blindly. As I watch my daughter in the pool working and training through each practice, I’m reminded of that lesson.

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January 24th 2015. It’s three in the morning, the snowfall is near white out condition and I’m looking at the weather in Connecticut and New York. My destination is the Javitz Convention Center in Manhattan. Only an experienced driver or a madman would head out in this weather. But my older daughter was auditioning for “The Voice” and needed me to drive her. “It’ll be an adventure,” she said flashing me that patented angelic smile reserved for when she really wanted something. So a week later here we are, headed off in the storm, Rachel looking out into the darkness and me gripping the steering wheel as we sloshed through the snow. We saw several spinouts and accidents but we had to keep going. Half the time my car was barely holding the road and any turn of the wheel would make us an accident statistic. A four hour ride took seven terrifying hours. But we made it.

The lines and crowds were spectacular. I waited in line with her for another ninety minutes and the group she was with was called in. Because of her age, she didn’t require a parent escort, I got to sit around and fret and hope and pray that she’d come out with a pink ticket. I had my Visa card and would gladly charge the $500.00 it would cost to stay in a hotel if she made the cut to tomorrow. Another hour later she texted me, “I didn’t get picked.” My heart sank. There must have been something wrong, my daughter sings like the most beautiful songbird. I dreaded the long ride home. Another snowstorm would be welcome over the black cloud that would be hanging over my car all the way back to Massachusetts.

I saw Rachel and she smiled, she wasn’t upset and simply said, “They loved my voice, but I didn’t have the right look, whatever that means, oh and I saw Blake Shelton, he was here for Saturday Night Live.’ I was blown away, she handled the disappointment like a trooper, we laughed on the way back to the car and I enjoyed the time with her. The ride back was light and fun despite the snow falling again. That ride home was one of those memories I will treasure forever, I gained a new insight and admiration for Rachel. She took what most would have taken as a debilitating setback and saw it as a positive experience. She wasn’t daunted or discouraged.

Life doesn’t always deal a natural strait flush or four of a kind, sometimes you’re dealt a crappy hand and just have to wait for that hand play out and start with a fresh set of cards. I was never more proud of my daughter than at that moment, she’d had solos before and large parts in plays etc, but this was an indication of her inner strength character. She understood and accepted disappointment without anger or frustration. It was a lesson in how to handle rejection and disappointment.

I’ve been on the receiving end of some letters of rejection from Penguin, DAW and a few hunting magazines and I’ve learned that handling and coping with rejection is more important than celebrating success. Failure builds character and determination. It makes me a better writer and will no doubt make Rachel a better singer. It also defines how we handle life’s larger setbacks; we can accept them and move forward, learning from the experience or be debilitated by failure and never try again. My daughter learned the lesson and discovered the right attitude. When I get down on myself or when things seem to be falling apart I like to flash back to that drive home and the precious hours we spent bonding over an unsuccessful Voice audition. I brush off the setback and try again, pushing myself harder.

 

As parents we spend our lives teaching our children, hoping the lessons sink in, I look at my children and realize how much I’ve relearned from them, my lessons being re-taught through their lives. There’s no bigger reward for me as a father than to spend individual time with my children, to reignite the bond and simply catch up with their hectic lives and let them know even though I’m not always around, I’ll always be there and they’ll always be with me, no matter how far away life’s journey takes them.

Greg Ballan is the author of the science fiction thrillers Hybrid and Hybrid Forced Vegeance. You can purchase them both at Lachesis Publishingamazon.com, Barnes and Noble, and kobo.

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Let me apologize in advance to any Romance Novelist who may be upset over my obvious lack of perception and understanding of your genre and the topic, overall.  When this topic was suggested to me, my initial reaction was to laugh out loud and roll my eyes.  Clearly my publisher had made THE WORST choice to tackle this subject.  I am far from a ‘Love Guru’, how could I pontificate and comment on this topic with any shred of credibility? Like any quest for knowledge when one finds oneself lacking, approach those around you and gather a data set from a diverse population; which is what I spent three days doing.

Image: surfingbird.ru

I asked several colleagues of varying ages and gender their definition and opinion of romance and if he/she was familiar with romance novels.  The results from the male gender were pretty much what I expected. They all vehemently denied any knowledge or familiarity with the genre beyond the occasional “My wife has one or two on her nightstand and no I’ve never picked one up.”  When I pushed for a definition of ‘Romance’ I was taken aback by how guarded the men became.  I got suspicious looks and raised eyebrows and arms almost always folded indicating I’d crossed into uncomfortable body language territory. I swore anonymity yet still wasn’t able to crack that guarded man wall of secrecy. One guy went so far as to question my manhood for even broaching such a topic. It seems that Romance, in the data set available to me, is something not discussed among my gender. Upon reflection I admit that the topic has NEVER come up in conversation when I’ve been socializing with other men at any type of gathering.  The topics have been work, sports, some fantasy football league, and often trashing some politician or even talking about house projects. Conversations at my rod and gun club are limited to fishing, deer hunting, crossbows, rifles etc., but never in my 52 years have I been exposed to guys discussing romance. Okay, message received. Bros don’t discuss ‘Romance’ with other bros lest they lose their male membership card. If there are men discussing romance and the like, I’ve been missing out on those discussions. Could it be me, the type of hobbies and the people I spend time with?  Quite possibly . . . but I deliberately spoke with as diverse a group as possible. My conclusion is that men don’t want to talk about it, at least with other men, especially a writer trying to gain some insight.

Image: http://cordeliahsuphotography.tumblr.com/

The women I spoke to varied in age and, once I explained I was writing a blog, they were more than willing to indulge me in their opinions of romance and why they read romance novels.  The one single comment I heard from each women was that the book they were reading was incredibly well written and compelling. The second most common answer was the novels were a wonderful escape from the mundane of the daily drag of work, kids and reality. I got that, it was pretty much the same reason I read science fiction and graphic novels; for a diversion and an escape from the stress and anxiety of the daily grind. As far as explaining and defining romance, I could sense a bit of hesitation.  I was given great anecdotes from several people but the detective in me wanted a real time answer. What about today, what defined romance for them today?  I got a great deal of rolled eyes and laughter. One funny answer was simply her boyfriend not farting under the sheets at night. One woman my age was much more concise and how shall I say. . . critical with her answers.  I’ll call her ‘Kim.’

It’s Fabio! Image: www.chicagogluttons.com

Kim has been married for several years and has four kids, we talk a lot at the gym while waiting to get on various equipment.  We were using the elliptical trainers and chatting to pass the time when I decided, why not broach the topic and ask her a few questions?  At least she couldn’t run away. I worked up the nerve to segue our light banter from griping about being winded to romance. To my surprise and delight Kim was very direct and honest with her replies. After fifteen years of marriage, changing diapers through four children and having a husband more excited by his new Callaway driver than by her, she began looking for something to fill the void.  She added that her husband was a good man who worked hard and was a great father, but he’d rather spend time his free time at the driving range than having a romantic dinner or a date night.  A friend in a local church group loaned her a copy of a particular steamy romance novel with a real hunk on the cover. She laughed as she recalled the book cover hunk was Fabio.  I remember that name, some big, long-haired blonde guy with huge pecs and biceps. If I remember he also did margarine commercials.  She enjoyed the novel immensely and admitted to getting all hot and bothered by the intimate scenes and the passion found within the pages of that book. From then on Kim decided to spend her evenings and down time with a romance novel tucked in her purse and has become ‘best friends’ with the works of Victoria Dahl and Vivian Arend. “When the kids are in school and he’s at work, I like to curl up under a blanket with a hot cup of cinnamon tea and escape into another world of intrigue and passion. I know it’s never going to happen to me, but it’s nice to pretend and be swept up.” I asked Kim to define ‘Romance’.  She laughed for a moment looked over at me as we were both dripping with sweat.  “Well it’s certainly not this.”  I laughed at her wit and repeated the question.  Kim slowed her pace and took a deep breath, “Greg, if you have to ask me that question and really don’t know the answer I feel sorry for you.  You have the same affliction infecting my husband and a lot of other men.” I winced a bit at the sting of her retort but she then rewarded me with an answer, “Romance is the non-physical acts of love two people show for each other, it’s the little things that make certain somebody feels special, desired and cherished by their partner.”

Kim cranked up her pace and told me to chew on that for awhile, she put on her earphones and got back to her quick pace.  After another twenty minutes pondering, Kim finished her workout, she looked over at me and could tell I was still smarting from her remark.  “I didn’t mean to insult you; if I did I’m sorry.  You’re a nice guy, Greg and I figured you could handle the reality check.”

Image: www.pinterest.com

I left the gym with Kim’s point blank response echoing in my head.  I stopped at my favorite coffee haunt and thought more about Romance.  Were we men, as a gender, all negligent husbands forcing our spouses to seek attention or gratification within the pages of some writer’s imagination?  I reflected back on the first time I fell in love, the way my heart skipped a beat, how my mind was solely focused on her, I knew her scent, every curve of her face and longed just to hear her voice and be with her.  I remember the dates, the long walks and picnics and the hand holding. I recall carrying her across a large puddle because she didn’t want to get her new boots wet and how she giggled as I waded through the ankle deep water carrying her.  I remember showering her with flowers not because I just wanted intimacy, but I loved to see her smile and the delightful squeal she made when she was happy.  I remember spending hours under the hood of her mom’s beat up station wagon and shelling out my own money on car parts not because I had to, but because I knew it was important to her and I knew it would make her happy.  That was romance, that was how I showed her I loved her. It wasn’t the words, it wasn’t the physical joining, it was the gestures and deeds I made when we were together that let her know I cared.  I made her feel special and important and I got love, affection and companionship in return.  Romance is the non-physical acts of love we show our partners.

Image: slism.com

I knew it all along but lost the meaning over the years. I remembered the feeling of falling freshly in love and the natural high that came along with it, the heart skipping a beat, the electric jolt caused by a single touch of a fingertip.  I remembered romance, what I did because of love, the small and large selfless deeds I never thought twice about when I was younger but confess, balk at doing now, or do with a grumble under my breath. Working on my mother in law’s car isn’t always done happily, and often I catch myself rolling my eyes at the thought of stepping out of my comfort zone and expressing myself or my feelings. I often hear the words but fail to listen. I looked back over a litany of self-failings over my iced coffee and wondered what that drop of moisture was rolling down my cheek. How does it all change? Does life and time really have such an impact? What changes in relationships that kill or cool the romance?  What goes wrong?

I’ve never read a romance novel. But I know from those I’ve spoken with that it’s more than just sex; it’s the excitement of discovering a new love, a new connection. I’m sure the male character does all the right things, slays the dragon, conquers the evil or is just there for the support needed or just to listen. I assume that’s the appeal more than the steamy scenes that cause one’s heart to flutter and forms beads of perspiration on the brow. Again that’s my conclusion based on dipping my toe into a pool I’ve never swum before. I believe it’s the crafted tale, the developed characters and story telling complimented by romantic gestures, the non-physical acts of love, that make the eventual physical bonding so powerful and intense (Also a gifted writer behind it). It’s not just the buff, shirtless guy on the cover; it’s the deeds done in the relationship not just inside the bed sheets that have the appeal. I think.

Image: warosu.org

So how does romance work after years of marriage, several kids, two careers, soccer practices, yard work and a “Dad Bod” versus “Six pack abs”?  I honestly just don’t know. Maybe after years together it’s no longer about the grand gestures, maybe the small things have just as much meaning. Maybe making sure the toilet seat is down, emptying the dishwasher and putting away the laundry are just as important as carrying someone across a large puddle or doing a brake job on a car. Perhaps the simple daily acts of consideration can communicate wordlessly what men, myself included, may have forgotten or neglected to do over time. I’m not saying bringing home flowers and candy more than once a year on Valentine’s Day isn’t appreciated but perhaps the simple, yet helpful, gestures go further to prove love is still alive and the fire hasn’t tuned to ashes.  A simple action is worth more than a thousand words . . . even if those words are ‘I love you.’ Showing you care is always better than saying you care. Maybe, just maybe, that’s what romance is all about.

I’m just a Science Fiction writer out of his swim lane, but I think I get the point.

Greg Ballan is the author of the science fiction thrillers Hybrid and Hybrid Forced Vegeance. You can purchase them both at Lachesis Publishingamazon.com, Barnes and Noble, and kobo.

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Author Joe McKinney

In our ongoing series THE BOOK THAT HOOKED YOU at the Lachesis Publishing Daily Blog we feature Q and As with established and successful authors who tell us about the books and authors they love as well as telling us about the books they are working on.

Today’s Q and A features Joe McKinney, the multi-talented and a Bram Stoker Award winning author (multiple times) of horror fiction, science fiction and crime thrillers. Joe McKinney is based in San Antonio where he is a sergeant for the San Antonio Police Department where he helps to run their 911 Dispatch Center. He has been a homicide detective and a disaster mitigation specialist. 

Take us back to when you first discovered horror and science fiction. When did you become a reader? How old were you? What were some of the books that made an impact on you?

JM: My gateway drug was Stewart Cowley’s SPACEWRECK. An absolutely beautiful book. Every page featured a full size colored painting of some eerie, abandoned spaceship. There was a two or three page short story to go with each painting, and I would spend hours going through them. I must have read that book a thousand times. I think I was seven when I first found that book, and after that I went into Robert Heinlein’s juveniles. My favorite of those was SPACE CADET.

Tell us about a few of the authors who inspired you, when you first started in your own writing career?

JM: One big inspiration was Lee Thomas. We met at a convention in Dallas shortly after I published my first novel, and we’ve been friends ever since. Lee has been through just about joy and nightmare the publishing world can throw at an author, and he was a tremendous mentor. As to authors who inspired me, I’d have to point to Robert McCammon. His early works were amazing takes on classic horror tropes, like vampires and zombies and werewolves. But after that, he went into these fantastically lush novels like Boy’s Life and Swan Song that set the bar impossibly high. When I write, I push myself to try to be that good.

You write horror, science fiction, and crime novels. Tell us what draws you to those three genres?

JM: You know, I think the genre finds you and not the other way around. It’s like water finding its own level. You end up in horror because you have to be there. I’m a pretty upbeat guy most of the time, and I try to have a great deal of fun in everything I do, but when I write, it just ends up going to dark places. I wish I could give you a better answer than that, but that’s about the size of it.

Image of Joe McKinney perpetualpublishing.com

You’re a police supervisor in your “day job”. How does your very challenging police work impact your writing?

JM: Well, police work has colored my entire writing career. Not only because a lot of my characters tend to be cops, but also my approach to characters. In fact, I think it’s impossible to underestimate the influence it’s had on my writing. You can’t do this job without it changing you in a fundamental way. Maybe that’s where the dark stuff comes from.

Tell us about a book that you’ve read recently (past year) that blew you away (can be from any genre).

JM: That’s easy. 14 by Peter Clines was an amazing science fiction adventure story with a crazy Lovecraftian turn at the end. A young man is looking for a cheap apartment in the heart of LA. He finds one, but after he moves in, finds one odd quark of the building after another. Any one of them wouldn’t amount to much, but when taken in their totality, they add up to a mystery with shades of a government conspiracy and cosmic horror. Trust me, one of the best times I’ve ever had between the covers of a book. I also loved The Martian by Andy Weir and Ready Player One by Earnest Cline.

A 1939 Underwood Typewriter found on etsy.com https://www.etsy.com/listing/82465142/vintage-typewriter-1939-underwood-master

What is the coolest thing a reader has ever said (or done) for you?

JM: I once wrote a magic typewriter story called “Writing for Exposure.” A fan of mine enjoyed it so much he found a 1939 Underwood typewriter, completely restored it, and sent it to me as a gift. It has a special place of honor on the shelf in my office.

You’ve won the Bram Stoker Award twice now – tell us about your books that won and how you feel about being on that illustrious list?

The first time I won was for my novel Flesh Eaters. That’s the origin story for my zombie series, The Dead World. You can probably tell from what I’ve written above that I’m a huge Robert McCammon fan. Well, he was one of the presenters for the award, and when I went up to the stage to receive it, McCammon leaned in and whispered, “Great job, Joe. I love your book.” I nearly fainted right there. To this day, that remains one of my finest writing moments ever.

Tell us about your latest release THE DEAD WON’T DIE (part of an ongoing series) Tell us about the book and the series.

JM: The Dead Won’t Die is Book 2 in my new zombie series, The Deadlands. It’s been thirty years since the zombie apocalypse, and only little pockets of humanity have survived. One of those communities is a place called Arbella. Arbella has not only survived, but thrived, and now they are getting so big they need to expand. The trouble is, nobody knows what’s out there. So, one of the up and coming members of the community, First Deputy of the Constabulary Jacob Carlton, organizes an expedition to go explore the Deadlands. In the first book Jacob and his friend Kelly Banis barely survive their encounter with the nomadic communities that wander the Deadlands. They are rescued by a super advanced society called Temple. The Dead Won’t Die takes us into a vast conspiracy that is threatening to destroy Temple from the inside out. Fun stuff, with tons of zombie action thrown in to boot.

What are you currently working on and when can we expect it to be released?

JM: I’m currently finishing up Book 3 in a series that I’m writing with Craig DiLouie and Stephen Knight. My installment is called Die Laughing. The series takes place in the present day, along the Eastern seaboard. A new disease called The Bug appears on the scene, and it turns its victims into unspeakably cruel and viscous killers. The disease victims are called Klowns because they cannot control their laughter. It’s how they process pain, both their own and their victims. A battalion of light infantry is in Boston when the series starts, tasked with protecting the populace. But they never had a chance, and now they are in full retreat. The first book was about getting out of Boston. The second book was about the rolling gunfight that got them to Philadelphia. That’s where I pick it up.

You’re a writer of horror and crime and sci-fi. What truly scares you?

JM: Well, snakes and heights. But those are just things that give me the creeps. When I think about things that truly terrify me, I think about Alzheimer’s disease. I watched my grandfather die of that, seeing his mind taken from him just scared me to death. Now that I’m older, the fear is even stronger.

Bonus: What is your “go-to” snack when you’re writing?

JM: Popcorn. Definitely popcorn.

Joe McKinney is the San Antonio-based author of several horror, crime and science fiction novels. His longer works include the four part Dead World series, made up of Dead City, Apocalypse of the Dead, Flesh Eaters and The Zombie King; the science fiction disaster tale, Quarantined, which was nominated for the Horror Writers Association’s Bram Stoker Award for superior achievement in a novel, 2009; and the crime novel, Dodging Bullets. His upcoming releases include the horror novels Lost Girl of the Lake, The Red Empire, The Charge and St. Rage. Joe has also worked as an editor, along with Michelle McCrary, on the zombie-themed anthology Dead Set, and with Mark Onspaugh on the abandoned building-themed anthology The Forsaken. His short stories and novellas have been published in more than thirty publications and anthologies.

Connect with Joe McKinney via is his website, on facebook, twitter, @JoeMcKinney and you can email him at joemckinney2033@gmail.com

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THIS WEEK’S DEAL OF THE WEEK is science fiction/suspense thriller Hybrid by Lachesis Publishing author, Greg Ballan (Book 1 in the Hybrid series). YOU CAN GET IT RIGHT HERE AT LACHESIS PUBLISHING FOR ONLY .89 CENTS! THIS WEEK ONLY! (Monday July 6 until Friday July 10). CLICK HERE TO PURCHASE.

You can also get Hybrid  at amazon.com, Barnes and Noble, and kobo.

What it’s about:

Erik Knight, a small time private investigator, always knew he was different from everybody else. Keener senses, heightened awareness and an enhanced physical strength that could be called upon by his sheer will.

Erik becomes involved with a team of high profile investigators and local police trying to locate a girl who was kidnapped in the middle of a playground amongst dozens of adults and children. None of the adults saw anything and what the children claim to have seen is too far fetched to be believed. The search evolves into a full-scale manhunt into the dark and desolate woodlands of the Hopedale Mountain.

After a lethal encounter and a fatality, Erik, the investigators and police realize that what they’re dealing with isn’t a man and possibly isn’t of this world. What they’re dealing with is a sentient evil that has an appetite for young children.

EXCERPT:

“Erik!” Shanda whispered in alarm. “Something’s here, stalking the girls. I can’t see it, but I can sense it.”

Erik looked throughout the park grounds, focusing his vision, but he couldn’t see anything. Fifty yards away, the children played unaware of anything but their innocent fun. Erik walked quickly over to where the party was, Shanda following close behind him. As he closed the distance he noticed that his daughter was staring at something and pointing. Erik looked in the direction she was pointing and saw a patch of darkness. His mind shrieked with panic and he ran toward his daughter, screaming for the other girls to leave the park area. The girls looked at the direction Brianna was pointing at and froze. They were terrified, frozen into inaction.

After a quick sprint, Erik was beside his daughter. Several of the other mothers had gone to their children as they all pointed out the closing patch of darkness.

“Get your children back!” Erik commanded. “It wants your children.”

Mothers and children were panicking. Children were crying with fright as the afternoon sun seemed to dim and the temperature in the park suddenly dropped twenty degrees. Brianna hadn’t moved since Erik came by her side.

“What do you see, honey?” he whispered.

Brianna’s eyes were transfixed on the corner of the park. Her finger still pointed in that direction. “It’s a tall man, I think. I can tell that it wants me. It’s calling to me, Daddy. I’m scared. Please don’t let it take me. I can tell it wants to take me.” She screamed in mindless terror.

Erik reached behind his back and pulled his Ruger from its place of concealment. He wrapped both arms protectively around his daughter, his gun pointing in the direction of her finger.

“Bri, point me in the right direction. I won’t let it hurt you. No one is taking you anywhere.”

She gently guided his hands so that the pistol was aiming at the heart of the dark anomaly.

“Daddy,” she whispered, “it’s coming right for us.”

“Go back with Shanda and the others, now!” he told her.

“Daddy, I don’t want to leave you.”

“Go, honey! Please,” he whispered. “Shanda!” Erik shouted, breaking the eerie silence. “Take Brianna.”

Shanda came up quickly and took Brianna. “I can just barely see it, Erik; it’s just like you described. It stopped when you pulled the gun. All the children can see it, but the parents can’t. All they can see is the darkness, and they can feel the cold.”

From behind them, the ponies were shrieking in panic.

“All right, you two, get back!” Erik stood up. He holstered his weapon and began walking toward the darkness.

“I know you’re there!” Erik called out to the inky darkness. “Maybe you can hide from them, but you can’t hide from me!” Erik focused his eyes; concentrating his extra senses on the darkness as he continued forward. Slowly he saw the man-like figure materialize. The figure had stopped its approach and assumed an aggressive stance. Erik paused a scant twenty feet from it and assumed a basic combat stance he used in Kung Fu.

“You can’t have the children!” he shouted, his voice booming above the silence, challenging the being of darkness. “You can’t have my daughter or any other child here.”

The thing responded with silence. Erik finally saw the blood-red eyes looking right through him. He could feel the hatred, the sheer malevolence; yet, now he also felt desperation, a hunger that was beyond his ability to define. The hostility threatened to overwhelm him. Erik fought his own emotions, fought down his own fear and doubt. He knew he couldn’t defeat this thing physically, but he would not let it have his daughter or any other child there, not while he drew breath.

Like what you’ve read? You can get Hybrid right here at Lachesis Publishing at a special price this week only! Or on amazon.com, Barnes and Noble, and kobo.

To read some of Greg’s musings visit his writing page on facebook, for several short stories and pithy takes on yard work and homelife.

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Science fiction/suspense thriller author Greg Ballan is our Q and A guest for today. Greg has a science fiction/suspense series with Lachesis Publishing called the Hybrid series. (HYBRID and HYBRID: Forced Vengeance). The series follows a private investigator with abilities that are decidedly super-human and “other-worldly”.

Why are you a writer?

I’m a writer because there’s a desire inside me that yearns to spin a tale for the amusement of others. I’m a writer because I like to take my mind to places I’ll never be able to see and experience and the thought of sharing the trip with others through words gives me a sense of personal satisfaction. I’m a writer because I love to paint pictures with words and see how others react to my verbal canvas. I also write for therapy; after a long, stressful day sitting down in a quiet venue with a cup of coffee and manipulating characters in a little world of my own creation makes feel like I have some sense of control over something . . . and it’s a hell of a lot cheaper than seeing a ‘Shrink’ ;).

What do you love to read in your spare time?

http://mashable.com/2013/07/16/batman-price-infographic/

I love Graphic Novels and Comic Books. Yes, even at fifty one years of age. I have a vast collection of Batman novels that I reread over and over again because the art work and the stories are riveting. My son, Thomas, is also a huge fan of the genre and he often brings home material for me to read. He is an aspiring artist/novelist in his own right and I enjoy reading his publications on his YouTube channel.  Amusing anecdote: I was doing some writing at my local coffee haunt and had a copy of ‘Batman: The Long Halloween’ on the table by my laptop. A young boy walked up to me and yelled “Batman!! Cool!!” at the top of his lungs. He started talking about Batman, Robin, Nightwing and the entire cast in amazing detail. I spent twenty minutes talking about who was the best Robin and why Batman could kick Captain America’s butt in a “Real” fight. I felt like a kid again and thoroughly enjoyed myself. The boy’s mother came by frantic, apparently he got bored waiting for her at the dry cleaners and walked off into the coffee shop on his own. I can imagine any mother seeing her son with a middle aged, balding man with three days of beard in a ratty tee shirt would be just cause for a fright.

She couldn’t get Jeffrey to leave; he wanted to keep talking about Batman with the “Writer man.” Jeffrey’s mom, however didn’t seem to thrilled by me (I admit I wasn’t at my best but I gather I really looked creepy.) I took a moment and introduced myself. I told the terrified mother that I was a father of three and perfectly harmless, I told Jeffrey I was here all the time and I’d love to talk Batman with him again. I gave him the book as a present since I had two more copies at home. He smiled and nodded leaving with his still nervous mother.

About three weeks later I was standing in line to get my coffee on a Saturday when I heard “Hey!!! Writer Man!!! Mom it’s the writer man! Did you bring any Batman books?”

Jeffrey ran up to me and immediately engaged me in Batman talk and showed me his new Batman shirt. Jeffrey’s mom and dad seemed okay with their son standing in line talking to me at 100 miles an hour in that hyper excited eight-year-old voice. Jeffrey and I talked shop and I ignored the looks from the adults around us as I happily discussed bat mobiles, batarangs and everything else that popped into his head. I’ve seen Jeffrey a few more times and each time he’s happy to see me and talk about Batman. I even think his parents aren’t creeped out by me anymore.

If I want a change of pace, I’ll break out some George R.R. Martin’s ‘Game of Thrones’ novels and get immersed in his world of back stabbing medieval politics and corruption.

What are three things that you do that are important to your career as a writer (aside from actually writing the book)?

The first and foremost thing I do is promote myself.  I have a writer’s page on facebook and I use it as an outlet to post several short columns. There is a lot of time in between publishing a novel and I sincerely believe that columns and short anecdotes serve to keep a readers interest in my work until the next long novel is released.

The second thing (and it ties into promotion) is I make myself accessible to those who enjoy my work. I like hearing from people who read my work. I love to interact and give a part of myself. If somebody has taken the time and effort to read my novels and then wants to reach out to me by e-mail or an instant message I will go out of my way to reply not with a simple few words but to really engage a reader in some deep discussion. I want any fan I have to really know that I appreciate them and the time they take to read my stories.

Greg Ballan looking tough.

The third thing I do is exercise and stay fit . . . before someone rolls their eyes, let me elaborate. Stress and anxiety kill my creativity. I work long hours at an often times stressful job. I’ve seen colleagues get completely burnt out in my career field and simply turn into couch potatoes. Exercise allows me an outlet to burn off that stress and keep both my mind and my body fine tuned. When I have the chance to sit down and write a few pages of my next novel or pen a column I’m mentally sharp and ready to give it my all and produce the best work I can. It may sound odd but it really works for me.

What are three of your top goals in your writing career?

My first goal is simple; every new story I tell must be as good but preferably better than the one before. I want readers to keep coming back to my stories and look forward to a next release. This is a lofty goal I admit but it keeps me focused on the story and forces me not to settle for just getting it done.

My second goal is to make enough money so I can write as a career and not just a spare time passion. I believe if I can accomplish my first goal this goal will eventually happen. I want to sit at home, in my boxers and yellowed tee shirt with five days of beard growth clicking away at my keyboard with a Honey Dew French vanilla iced coffee intravenous drip keeping me going. And hopefully someone in my family will throw me a blueberry muffin once in awhile to keep me fueled as I tear through a WIP.

My third goal is to attend a writer’s convention as an actual speaker on the topic of creating contemporary Science Fiction. I would love to be able to talk about my passion and hopefully inspire others to follow in their dream as well. I believe that writers should help inspire other writers. If not for caring writers like Jenna Glatzer, Ed Williams and Jim MacDonald aiding and guiding my fledgling work I’d have never had the opportunity to be a part of the amazing Lachesis family.

What is your favourite first line ever from a novel?

“Fire all Phasers!” This is the first line from ‘The Vulcan Academy Murders’ by Jean Lorrah. The book opens with an epic ship-to-ship firefight full of pulse pounding action for two solid pages. I was instantly hooked and read the entire novel in one sitting. In my opinion a riveting action sequence serves as the ultimate hook in a story. Lorrah spreads riveting action sequences throughout the story like a master chef creating a literary delight full of mystery, suspense and brilliant story telling all the while remaining true to the Star Trek genre.

What is your go-to power energy snack when writing?

http://www.foodpost.ca/recipe-items/blueberry-muffins/

I need liquid energy in the form of iced coffee. I absolutely have to have and iced coffee or an RC Cola in arms reach during a long creative writing session. I also like Jif peanut butter with Smuckers strawberry jam on whole wheat bread to go along with the iced coffee. It’s a favorite snack food combination that helps fuel my inner muse. Also I have never been known to turn down a blueberry muffin.

What was a book that made you go “aha!” and why? (fiction or non fiction)

It was more if an “Augh!” moment that lead to an “aha” revelation. I was in high school killing time in a study hall when a friend of mine loaned me a paperback to pass away the boredom. My homework was already done and it was a Friday afternoon and I had an hour to pass sitting quietly at a desk. The book was ‘Elric of Melnibone’ by Michael Moorcock. I’d never heard of Elric or the author but decided I’d give the book a shot. I was spellbound from the first paragraph and the hour turning the pages of that book flew like seconds. My friend, Peter, let me borrow the book over the weekend and I devoured it in three hours. In 1981 there was no internet and not many bookstores, I had to wait until Monday to see Peter again and ask if he had more books from this amazing writer and his spellbinding, sword wielding sorcerer. Peter let me borrow the entire series and I spent the next two weeks riveted to the pages of these books following the adventures of an albino sorcerer and his hellblade that drank the souls of his enemies but really savored killing and stealing the souls of his friends. My “Augh” moment came as I read the final few pages of ‘Stormbringer’, the last of the Elric series at the time. The ending both shocked and moved me as a seventeen year old. I never saw this ending coming and literally screamed in dismay. Elric and his companion, Moonglum, were gone. The adventure was over! I literally tossed the book down on my bed, frustrated over the ending of this fantastic adventure. So powerful were Moorcock’s words that he grabbed me and made me a part of the world of his characters, he got me emotionally involved in his story and shocked me with an ending that would impact me more so than I ever realized back at the tender age of seventeen. I was devastated over the loss of what had become friends to me.

I sat with Peter at lunch the following day sharing my dismay and took some comfort that he too felt like he’d lost a friend when Eric died by his own sword and he said that many other people who read the Elric series shared my shock and dismay. There were no internet chat rooms at the time to discuss literature with thousands of people instantaneously but I took comfort in one person understanding the angst I felt the moment I read and digested the final pages of that novel and the stunning ending Moorcock had so masterfully crafted. A writer had managed to ensnare my thoughts and feelings with his words, he reached our through a book and moved me emotionally and made me think and ponder as well as entertain me more than any television show or movie ever could. What a powerful medium the written word could be.

I realized, that evening, that I wanted to have that gift, I wanted the ability to reach out beyond my confines and touch people with my words, create tales and characters so powerful that a reader would come to think of them not merely as characters on a page but a familiar friend waiting to take them on a fantastic journey to a faraway place as close as their imagination. I wanted to write words that elicited that kind of emotional response in people. Michael Moorcock and Elric made me want to become a writer, the dream may have gotten lost through college, marriage and children but it was never forgotten. The feeling and desire, though buried under the burden of responsibility, was never extinguished. Today I get to live part of that dream through the Hybrid series and the upcoming Lost Sons novels. I can only pray that some boy or girl will spend an evening with Erik Knight or Duncan Kord and have that same “aha” moment and find the desire to want to move others with their words as Michael Moorcock inspired me.

How do you cope with bad or nasty reviews?

LOL! Yeah . . . I know all about this question. There is one, one-star review on one of my books; it sits there mocking me every time I look at Amazon.com. It’s like having a huge zit on your face before a date with a beautiful woman. I confess that I was very upset and crestfallen after reading that review. It didn’t matter that I have many four and five star reviews praising the story and the writing. The fact that one person somewhere hated, and boy he REALLY hated the book, bothered me to no end. I read that scathing verse over and over again.

My friend and fellow author Ed Williams finally hit me with a southern clue-by-four and told me that this was a tough business and I needed to get a thicker skin. Ed told me no matter how hard I tried I wasn’t going to be able to please everyone and he read me some of the less than flattering reviews he’d received. Ed told me to look at the reviews of my favorite authors and I’d discover that they too had been panned by more than one less than flattering review. I took Ed’s advice and reviewed my heroes, David Eddings and Michael Moorcock; who could possibly dislike the writing of my two favorite authors? Well, to my astonishment and enlightenment many people didn’t like some of their work. At that point it clicked and I heard Ed’s voice on the phone in my head saying that you can’t please everyone.

Now I read the less than favorable reviews and do my best to take something productive from the criticism. What didn’t they like? Was it a valid point or just a personal attack from a frustrated idiot? If the critique had merit I need to learn from the criticism and move on to make sure I don’t repeat the mistake in my next project.

What do you listen to when you write?

I am a HUGE fan of the Canadian Tenors! I have their rendition of ‘Forever Young’ blaring in the background on my laptop as I’m typing at this very moment; Victor, Remy, Clifton and Fraser are amazing solo singers, but combine those voices and the result is absolutely incredible. I’ll run through their entire CD over and over again (much to the dismay of my family) while I’m crafting a scene or working through dialogue. Often times I’ll find myself singing along to a tune and that’s where my family draws the line… God may have given me the gift of some writing talent but I missed the line when it came to singing ability. My singing has been compared to the death knells of a wounded hound dog.

Cats or dogs?

I am a dog lover in a family of cat enthusiasts. I grew up with dogs and I loved the sense of companionship and loyalty provided by a canine companion. A dog is genuinely happy to see you when you walk through the door, a cat really doesn’t give a hoot whether you’re there or not as long as the food bowl is full. Dogs have more personality and genuinely enjoy interaction with people while cats seem to be more aloof and independent, at least the ones I’ve been forced to live with.

I’ve also realized that cats are vindictive creatures, they know if you don’t like them and they go out of their way to make your life miserable. I’ve been on the receiving end of multiple cases of cat vandalism over the last decade. I’ve endured cats pooping in my closet and in my boots. I’ve suffered through cats peeing on my custom $1,500.00 Bob Lee hunting bow and clawing the Brazilian Rosewood riser and chewing through the custom bow string. Our cats have peed on my summer racing rims for my car and have left me multiple ‘presents’ in my gym area. Our cats knew I was the enemy and made no mistake about targeting my stuff. For the record . . . I never hurt these hell spawned fur balls of destruction. They knew to stay close to my wife after a coordinated attack on my beloved personal property. But I knew they were secretly mocking me.

We’re now down to one cat, Katie. She and I have come to an understanding. I’ll scratch her behind her ears, feed her and give her fresh water and even endure cleaning her litter box as long as she stays out of my gym area and away from my stuff. So far so good, we live a peaceful co-existence. She’ll meow at me once in awhile when she wants to get her head or back scratched and gently tap me with her paw when her water dish is empty. When she wants food she knows to walk by my legs and rub against my shins.   Somehow the cat knows the back basement room is off limits and she’ll never venture there and she’ll stay out of my closet and away from my desk. We have an understanding if you can achieve such a thing with a cat. As far as cats go I can live with Katie but somehow I think I’ve been trained by this clever feline to do her bidding.

You can purchase Hybrid and Hybrid Forced Vegeance at Lachesis Publishingamazon.com, Barnes and Noble, and kobo.

To read some of Greg Ballans’s musings visit his writing page on facebook, for several short stories and pithy takes on yard work and homelife.

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Today’s Round 3 Q and A  is with Lachesis Publishing author David Lee Summers. David has written several horror and science fiction novels for Lachesis including The Pirates of Sufiro which is free, and Dragon’s Fall: Rise of the Scarlet Order.

Why are you a writer?

I’m a writer because I have to be. It’s a way for me to process thoughts and emotions and give expression to the ideas that pop into my head all the time. I have dealt with the big questions of life, death, and their meaning through my vampire stories. When I was first diagnosed with arthritis, I created the character Roberts in the Old Star/New Earth books who had arthritis and lived a long productive life. It helped me visualize the same thing for myself. My forthcoming novel, The Astronomer’s Crypt, allowed me to explore both the things I love about my work in astronomy and those things that scare me working in large, mostly empty buildings late at night on a remote mountaintop. In a sense, writing is cheap psychotherapy, but it’s more than that. It’s an important part of my psyche.

What do you love to read in your spare time?

For the most part, I love to read the kinds of fiction I write. I love science fiction, horror, and paranormal novels. Lately I’ve been reading quite a bit of Stephen King and Anne Rice. I also love mysteries and historical fiction. It’s hard to go wrong with Patrick O’Brien’s Master and Commander series. I especially enjoy delving into the classics of these genres and seeing those works which inspired the modern day giants. I love Jules Verne, Mary Shelly, and H.P. Lovecraft. I’m also a big fan of reading outside my comfort zone to see how authors of other genres handle character, action, and setting.

What are three things that you do that are important to your career as a writer (aside from actually writing the book)?

I travel to conventions, which gives me an opportunity to interact with fellow writers and readers. I blog at both davidleesummers.wordpress.com and dlsummers.wordpress.com, which gives me a chance to interact with readers in an in-depth way online. I do research into my writing which not only helps me get the details of my writing correct, but gives me insight into other people and cultures, which adds depth to my writing.

What are three of your top goals in your writing career?

One of my favorite parts of writing is to see how my words are interpreted by others. One of the most exciting things for me is to see a story of mine illustrated or the cover art an illustrator comes up with for my novel. So, with that in mind, I think two of my top goals would be for a good voice actor to read the audiobook version of one of my books, and to have one of my books or stories made into a film. Finally, I would like to achieve a degree of financial success with my writing that if I wanted to travel somewhere to research an element of a story or meet with readers, I could do so without difficulty.

What is your favourite first line ever from a novel?

This is a tough one because there are a lot of great first lines, but I’m going to take the first line of Ray Bradbury’s From the Dust Returned. “In the attic where the rain touched the roof softly on spring days and where you could feel the mantle of snow outside, a few inches away, on December nights, A Thousand Times Great Grandmère existed.” I love it because there’s a great sense of time and a great sense that this person is not only old but ancient. It’s a little creepy because of the unconventional word choice: A Thousand Times Great Grandmère not only lived, she existed. The weather conveys an atmosphere of gloom and cold. He talks about rain and snow, not sunshine. Creepy as A Thousand Times Great Grandmère is, the rain is soft and the snow provides a mantle. She is both revered and tender. Ray Bradbury has crafted many, many great lines, but this is simply one of the best I can point to.

What is your go-to power energy snack when writing?

I love having a jar of nuts around when I’m writing. Cashews are my favorite, but peanuts or almonds are good, too. I also like to have a good supply of apples. I’m especially fond of Fuji apples, which I find very flavorful and nice for a writing break.

What was a book that made you go “aha!” and why? (fiction or non fiction)

The book that made me go “aha!” was The Magic Journey by John Nichols. It’s a contemporary novel about a woman in a small New Mexico town and what her friends and neighbors get up to. It’s often billed as “magical realism” because there are also angels in the novel. All through the novel, I saw parallels to the story of my mother growing up in New Mexico. It’s the book that made me realize I could tell a story like that one. My first novel, The Pirates of Sufiro, essentially started out by imagining what it would have been like if instead of homesteading New Mexico, my grandparents and great grandparents homesteaded a different world.

How do you cope with bad or nasty reviews?

Seeing a bad review is always shocking. I do my best to step away from the computer and give myself some distance. Once I’m a little more clear headed, I’ll look at the review and see if there was any way I could have made the book better for that person. If there is, I’ll file that away and try to make the next book better. Sometimes I realize the reviewer just picked a book that wasn’t for them. An honest and thoughtful review, even if it’s bad, is well appreciated. It means the person cared enough about the book to write about it. Very, very rarely, I’ll encounter someone with an axe to grind and the review will take a turn into the nasty. I’ve come to realize those people have a way of self-destructing with time and I do my best to stay as far away from them as I can so I’m not there when it happens.

What do you listen to when you write?

I have a collection of soundtrack albums from movies that I listen to when I write. I find they provide a great backdrop to my writing because they’re designed to accent rather than overshadow scenes. Because orchestral soundtracks don’t have words, they don’t distract me from my writing, but they do help me block out other things that might serve to distract me. Lately I’ve become particularly fond of soundtracks from Japanese anime.

Cats or dogs?

I love both and I have owned both cats and dogs over the years, but it’s been neither one since my wife and I discovered our kids are allergic to both cats and dogs! So these days it’s turtles. Specifically desert box turtles. It all started when my daughter won a desert box turtle at the Chihuahuan Desert Nature Park here in Las Cruces. He’s named Gamera after the Japanese kaiju. Since then, we adopted one more and his name is Mikey, after the Ninja Turtle Michelangelo.

You can purchase David Lee Summers’s books at Lachesis Publishing, on amazon, Barnes and Noble, kobo, and iBooks.

Connect with David Lee Summers. online via facebook and twitter, and check out his web site.

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