Archive for June 2014 | Monthly archive page

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedin

Today’s sneak peek is the romantic suspense novel Deadly Secrets by Leeann Burke (a.k.a. LeeAnn Lessard – your publisher at Lachesis Publishing And it’s one of our .99 cent deals! You can get it here. Lachesis Publishing donates a portion of the sales of Deadly Secrets are donated to the American Breast Cancer Foundation and Leeann donates her royalties of the sales to Deadly Secrets to the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation.

WHAT IT’S ABOUT:

Philippe Lafrance is a well known reclusive writer whose life is suddenly thrown upside down when the grandfather he never knew existed, dies. He investigates the reason and learns that his family has kept secrets from him. Deep, ugly secrets. Worse, a killer is murdering the men in his family. He discovers that his father, then his grandfather, were murdered by someone desperate to keep secrets buried.

Bereft, Roxanne St-Clair is left to manage a restaurant when the only person who ever mattered to her, her foster parent and mentor, is murdered. She puts her life on hold to find his killer and bring him to justice.

Thrown together by circumstance and a mutual goal, Philippe and Roxanne fight their attraction and team up to find the killer, bring him to justice and unearth the truth. To stay alive, they must keep one step ahead of the assassin in order to prevent him from killing his next target, Philippe.

Will they succeed in bringing to justice this killer before Philippe becomes his next victim? Will they be able to deal with the truth behind the deadly secrets?

EXCERPT:

A cold September breeze whipped at the fallen leaves near where she stood in front of the mahogany coffin. Roxanne St-Clair‘s curly long strands of hair were blown into her eyes. Unconsciously, she tucked them behind her ear as she glanced over at the lone man standing across the coffin from her. She turned her attention back to Father Joe, who was completing prayers for the final farewell of George Lafrance.

From his dark well-cut suit to his cold green eyes, this stranger, who resembled George, had to be the estranged grandson, Philippe Lafrance. The grandson no one knew existed until a few days ago.

Father Joe closed his bible and lowered his head in silent prayer. Roxanne took this moment to caress George‘s mahogany coffin in her own final private farewell. She would forever be grateful and indebted to the compassionate man.

Ten years ago, he‘d given her a chance at a better life when he took her in, becoming her last foster parent, her only family.

Father Joe straightened and cleared his throat. “Before we leave, I wish to take this opportunity, on behalf of George‘s family, to invite everyone back to Rock Heaven, and toast George one last time.” He gave a curt nod to the stranger, then to Roxanne.

People nodded, mumbled and began to scatter. Roxanne accepted the odd condolence but from the corner of her eye she watched Philippe linger by his grandfather‘s coffin. It looked as if he were saying his own farewell.

He raised his head, and their eyes connected for a fleeting moment. Was it sadness she saw in their depths? Quickly, he masked his angry jade eyes with aloofness. He acknowledged her with a curt nod, turned around and left without a backward glance.

Her best friend, Vanessa, leaned towards her. “You know Roxanne, in all the years I‘ve known George, I never heard him mention a word about a grandson. He talked about losing his son to a heart attack and his wife to breast cancer, but not a word about a grandson. It‘s kind of weird, don‘t you think?”

Against her own better judgment, Roxanne wondered as well.

The grandson had inherited George‘s build, from his broad shoulders and trim waist to chiseled face. The only difference was, George never made her heart flutter with a fleeting eye contact; his grandson did. She tore her gaze from Philippe‘s retreating back and turned her attention back to Vanessa. ―He must have had his reasons.‖

As if reading Roxanne‘s mind, Vanessa acknowledged her. “He does resemble George, don‘t you think?”

“I bet that‘s the only thing he has in common with George.” Roxanne couldn‘t help but stare at Philippe crossing between the cemetery gates. He reached a blue Toyota, unlocked the driver‘s door and slipped in.

Like what you’ve read? You can buy Deadly Secrets by Leeann Burke, right here.

Connect with Leeann Burke on her web site and on facebook

Like our Lachesis Publishing page on facebook. Follow us on twitter.

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedin

All our books are worth buying and tucking into, but we also love good deals! Here are a few:

We’ve got 13  books priced at .99 cents. Now, that’s what I call lucky 13! You can check them out here.

We’ve got 4 titles that are priced at nothing! That’s right. They’re free. You can check them out here.

Have a great weekend and Happy Reading!

Like our Lachesis Publishing page on facebook. Follow us on twitter.

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedin

Okay, I’m back again. Did you miss me? I haven’t published any of my own books (yet). But I have been writing for years. I started in journalism – radio/print, then moved into TV and film production. I did a lot of writing there – so technically I am published – not in print but on screen. I made a documentary about romance novels called Who’s Afraid of Happy Endings?. And here I am today, editing all of your books. What a wonderful job. I am truly blessed.

Dreamstimestockfreeimages.com

I’m an ideas person. If I get an idea about something that I think will work for someone I will let them know. It can be a work idea, or health-related, or hobby related,or TV show related (because I still pitch TV ideas as well). I have a friend who hosts a radio show and I gave her an idea for a call-in last week. She said, “Jo, you are an ideas machine.” Yes, I am. It’s one of my best qualities. My mind is always in motion. Ideas pop into my head all the time. I think this is why I love being an editor. I have emailed a few of you and said – hey, have you ever thought of writing about this? I would love to see a series about such and such.

Yes, I get ideas all the time, but I get inspired by people. By you guys and gals. I love brainstorming with you and coming up with a great book or series that I know you will love writing, and I will love editing, and readers will love reading.

Music, films, TV, conversations – (I love to eavesdrop in coffee shops) all inspire me. But it’s also those quiet moments when I’m in a meditative state – I just slow down and let my mind go – and that’s when I can come up with some great ideas. Sometimes it happens while I’m driving. Then I have to repeat it out loud, until I get to a stop and can record or write it down.

So let’s keep those ideas flowing. Let’s keep writing great books! Are you with me?

Have a great day!

jojo

Like our Lachesis Publishing page on facebook. Follow us on twitter.

Joanna D’Angelo is Editor in Chief at Lachesis Publishing Inc. She loves Cinnamon Dolce Lattes, a good book, and brainstorming ideas!

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedin

Harper Collins

I first fell in love with libraries when I was in elementary school. We actually had “library period”. We were taught the Dewey Decimal System and how to use card catalogs (before the computer!). I still love those old card catalogs. I wonder where you can get them? Then we’d have time to peruse the shelves and take out books. That made me happy. I discovered Dr. Seuss, the Ramona books by Beverly Cleary and the Choose Your Own Adventure books by R.A. Montgomery. Yay! We actually had a “pit” in our library. An area where we could sit and read. It was cool. I think “pits” were very popular in the 1970s – if it was “sunken” it was considered cool.

Current Publisher: ChoosecoOriginal Publisher: Bantam

I also loved the city library’s bookmobile. Oh, boy that was fun. The bookmobile would show up at our school once a week – usually after school or on the weekend. And we would go inside and find lots of great books to take out. I discovered Judy Blume there and books about travel and animals in far off places. My older sister loved all the biographies about kings and queens.

My high school library was where I first discovered historical romances. Kathleen Woodiwiss’s The Flame and the Flower and The Wolf and the Dove. I was hooked from that point on.

My university library was where I spent a ton of time. That didn’t give me as much pleasure. More angst than anything else. But I was always glad I could find a little nook to study.

I still love libraries. I visit my local branch at least once a week. The librarians know me and they ask how my work is going. They know I used to work in TV and now they know I work in publishing. At one point I wrote for a reality show – called The Letters, which was kind of like The Bachelor, only the bachelors and the bachelorette never saw each other (until the end!). Instead, they had to write love letters to each other. I had to do a ton of research for that. Reading romantic poetry by Byron and sonnets by Shakespeare. I had to create challenges for the guys that referenced those writers. That was lots of fun.

Libraries are places to discover and escape, learn and imagine. Libraries show us how much potential we have. They are full of ideas that other people have written down and shared with us. How wonderful is that?

Do you have any fond memories of libraries growing up? Or libraries you’ve encountered on your travels?

I know that our Lachesis authors love libraries too, but why not look up their books here?

Like our Lachesis Publishing page on facebook. Follow us on twitter.

Joanna D’Angelo is Editor in Chief at Lachesis Publishing Inc. She loves Cinnamon Dolce Lattes, a good book, and libraries!

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedin

Today’s Q and A is with Lachesis Publishing author Elaine Cantrell. Elaine has written a new adult contemporary romance called Her Kind of Man.

When did you first realize you wanted to become a writer and why?

Oh, I was only five years old when the writing bug bit me. My father had read a Little Golden Book to me, and I loved it so much I decided to write my own book using the same characters. My dad wrote it in pencil on notebook paper. It was a great story. It must have been because he laughed the entire time he read it. He kept it always, and after he died my stepmother gave it to me. It’s now one of my greatest treasures.

Describe your favourite place to write?

Until I get my study renovated, my favorite place to write is my recliner. My husband bought me a tiny desk whose top swings over my legs, so I sit in my recliner and write in comfort. We’re tackling the study renovation this summer, and how I do dread it!

What would I find on your desk at this very moment?

A printer and computer, two stuffed frogs holding a balloon my husband gave me for Valentine’s Day, a blue, crystal rabbit we bought at an antique store when we were in Charleston, SC, and a graduation program from my granddaughter’s college graduation.

What is your beverage of choice when you’re writing?

Water. Very cold water.

What do you love to read? 

LOL. Almost anything, but I’m not especially fond of erotica, biographies, or books where children get hurt or kidnapped.

What is some good advice you can give to an emerging writer?

Just don’t quit. Take workshops to learn what you can do to improve, and keep submitting.

What do you do after you finish a book? Do you celebrate or take a nap?

I feel sad so the nap would be the better choice. I’ve lived with my characters for months and months. I’ve gotten into their minds and endured lots of trouble with them, and now they’re gone. No, I don’t celebrate losing them, not even if I have something else ready to start.

You have written a contemporary romance for Lachesis Publishing, tell us about it? 

The book is called Her Kind of Man, and the cover is very . . . impressive. Here’s the blurb about the book, and may I say that the secret referred to in the blurb is something Kara never saw coming, something devastating.  Here’s a link to a link to a You Tube video I made for the book.

Blurb: Is it possible she’s finally found her kind of man?

Ross Williams has been in love with Kara Cochrane since they were kids, so when Kara’s fiancé Brandon Miles cheats on her and calls off their wedding—Ross steps in to rescue the damsel in distress.

A heartbroken Kara just wants to get on with her life and hunky Ross provides her with a definite distraction—that is until she starts falling for him. Big time.

But a devastating family secret threatens to destroy everything that Kara holds dear—including her relationship with Ross.

What do you enjoy about writing romance novels?

I think that first of all, they give people hope.  Most folks are fighting some kind of battle in their lives.  Maybe they’re in a relationship that went bad, and they’ve lost the one they love.  Whether it was by divorce, death, or just walking away, it tears a huge hole in someone’s heart.  Maybe the problem is health-related.  Someone has to accept that there are now limitations placed on them.  Have you ever dealt with unemployment?  How do you feed your children with no paycheck?  My romances always have a happy ending which gives us hope that tomorrow things will be better.  We can believe that ‘this too shall pass.’

Remember what happened at the end of Gone With the Wind?  Scarlett lost Rhett and collapsed in tears, but then she decided to go home to Tara where she can think of a way to get Rhett back. Human beings are designed to hope.

I also think that romances possibly satisfy our craving for justice.  In the real world, things don’t always end happily. Children are abused, the missing teen is never found, or our possessions are stolen. In the vast majority of romances you know the bad guys are going to get what’s coming to them. My heroes and heroines sometimes face determined villains, but you can rest easy in the knowledge that the bad guys will never win.

Last, I write romance because I’m a romantic at heart.  I just adore a good love story.

You didn’t know I was going to write a book on this question, did you? LOL. I cut and pasted from an old blog post I wrote.

What are you working on next?

Right now I’m working on an unnamed women’s fiction novel and editing something else. If I get tired of editing, I write for a while, and if I get tired of writing, I edit. Works for me. If you’re curious about the novel, I’ve been sharing snippets from it every Sunday for the past few weeks, and people seem to like the book, although they’re pretty ticked off at my hero. Go to http://www.elainepcantrell.blogspot.com and use the list of posts in the right hand column to hunt for recent Snippet Sunday and Weekend Writing Warriors posts. I’d read them in order if I were you because that way you’ll know what’s going on. Connect with Elaine Cantrell on her web site and on facebook and twitter.

Like our Lachesis Publishing page on facebook. Follow us on twitter.

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedin

Today’s Sneak Peek is the science fiction/suspense thriller Hybrid by Lachesis Publishing author, Greg Ballan (Book 1 in the Hybrid series)

What it’s about:

Erik Knight, a small time private investigator, always knew he was different from everybody else. Keener senses, heightened awareness and an enhanced physical strength that could be called upon by his sheer will.

Erik becomes involved with a team of high profile investigators and local police trying to locate a girl who was kidnapped in the middle of a playground amongst dozens of adults and children. None of the adults saw anything and what the children claim to have seen is too far fetched to be believed. The search evolves into a full-scale manhunt into the dark and desolate woodlands of the Hopedale Mountain.

After a lethal encounter and a fatality, Erik, the investigators and police realize that what they’re dealing with isn’t a man and possibly isn’t of this world. What they’re dealing with is a sentient evil that has an appetite for young children.

EXCERPT:

“Erik!” Shanda whispered in alarm. “Something’s here, stalking the girls. I can’t see it, but I can sense it.”

Erik looked throughout the park grounds, focusing his vision, but he couldn’t see anything. Fifty yards away, the children played unaware of anything but their innocent fun. Erik walked quickly over to where the party was, Shanda following close behind him. As he closed the distance he noticed that his daughter was staring at something and pointing. Erik looked in the direction she was pointing and saw a patch of darkness. His mind shrieked with panic and he ran toward his daughter, screaming for the other girls to leave the park area. The girls looked at the direction Brianna was pointing at and froze. They were terrified, frozen into inaction.

After a quick sprint, Erik was beside his daughter. Several of the other mothers had gone to their children as they all pointed out the closing patch of darkness.

“Get your children back!” Erik commanded. “It wants your children.”

Mothers and children were panicking. Children were crying with fright as the afternoon sun seemed to dim and the temperature in the park suddenly dropped twenty degrees. Brianna hadn’t moved since Erik came by her side.

“What do you see, honey?” he whispered.

Brianna’s eyes were transfixed on the corner of the park. Her finger still pointed in that direction. “It’s a tall man, I think. I can tell that it wants me. It’s calling to me, Daddy. I’m scared. Please don’t let it take me. I can tell it wants to take me.” She screamed in mindless terror.

Erik reached behind his back and pulled his Ruger from its place of concealment. He wrapped both arms protectively around his daughter, his gun pointing in the direction of her finger.

“Bri, point me in the right direction. I won’t let it hurt you. No one is taking you anywhere.”

She gently guided his hands so that the pistol was aiming at the heart of the dark anomaly.

“Daddy,” she whispered, “it’s coming right for us.”

“Go back with Shanda and the others, now!” he told her.

“Daddy, I don’t want to leave you.”

“Go, honey! Please,” he whispered. “Shanda!” Erik shouted, breaking the eerie silence. “Take Brianna.”

Shanda came up quickly and took Brianna. “I can just barely see it, Erik; it’s just like you described. It stopped when you pulled the gun. All the children can see it, but the parents can’t. All they can see is the darkness, and they can feel the cold.”

From behind them, the ponies were shrieking in panic.

“All right, you two, get back!” Erik stood up. He holstered his weapon and began walking toward the darkness.

“I know you’re there!” Erik called out to the inky darkness. “Maybe you can hide from them, but you can’t hide from me!” Erik focused his eyes; concentrating his extra senses on the darkness as he continued forward. Slowly he saw the man-like figure materialize. The figure had stopped its approach and assumed an aggressive stance. Erik paused a scant twenty feet from it and assumed a basic combat stance he used in Kung Fu.

“You can’t have the children!” he shouted, his voice booming above the silence, challenging the being of darkness. “You can’t have my daughter or any other child here.”

The thing responded with silence. Erik finally saw the blood-red eyes looking right through him. He could feel the hatred, the sheer malevolence; yet, now he also felt desperation, a hunger that was beyond his ability to define. The hostility threatened to overwhelm him. Erik fought his own emotions, fought down his own fear and doubt. He knew he couldn’t defeat this thing physically, but he would not let it have his daughter or any other child there, not while he drew breath.

Like what you’ve read? You can get Hybrid right here.

To read some of Greg’s musings visit his writing page on facebook, for several short stories and pithy takes on yard work and homelife.

Like our Lachesis Publishing page on facebook. Follow us on twitter.

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedin

Attention: Shameless Plug Alert. 😉

There is nothing better than tucking into a good book.

So check out some of our wonderful Lachesis authors this weekend!

Lots of great prices too! We have several books for only .99 cents! And some fun freebies too!

And don’t forget: Follow Lachesis Publishing on twitter and like our facebook page.

Have a great weekend!

Happy Reading.

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedin

Our guest blog today is by Lachesis Publishing author Lindy S. Hudis. Lindy has several titles with us, including the mystery Weekends, a women’s fiction with a dose of suspense City of Toys, and the erotica series Devon and Desiree which includes two installments so far: The S and M Club and The Mile High Club.

Our ongoing topic is: What inspires your writing? Welcome Lindy . . .

I have always been a writer, even before I knew what writing even was. As a child, I used to make up stories in my head, almost like being in a movie. I was a pretty isolated child, so I made up stories, people, characters and situations. I had no idea that I was, in a sense, writing. So, as a budding novelist with a wild imagination, I began to write my imaginary characters and stories down. I wrote my first short story at age nine or ten, and it was a ghost story. Every Halloween, or any family gathering, I was the one who was summoned and appointed to tell the ghost stories. I loved making up worlds and characters, and mostly loved scaring my cousins! However, as I got older, I had no interest in writing horror. One of my literary idols, Stephen King, would be a very tough act to follow.

I am inspired by the world around me. I am inspired by people, how they are, and how I feel they should be. “Crashers” is a morality tale about desperate people caught up in the underworld of crime due to circumstances beyond their control. The story was inspired by an actual event that happened to me. The situation was hardly serious, but the other parties involved became very greedy and selfish, and I was inspired to write my novel. The characters, although fictitious, are edgy, gritty and live on the edge of danger for their own covetous personal gain. Not that I have a fantasy about being that, but I like to see offensive characters get their comeuppance sometimes, which does not happen in real life as much as it should.

I write in many different genres, as I get inspired by many different things. Weekends was inspired by a very handsome man I knew many years ago. It was more a romantic fantasy, not unlike my erotic short stories. I love a bit of danger as well, so I have thrown a bit of suspense into my romantic story. I guess I have always had a fantasy of being a police detective, or being swept away by a gorgeous, handsome cop.  I almost feel that writers live in a fantasy world of their liking, and create inspiration from that world. I can’t speak for all writer’s, but that is how I operate.

My novel, City of Toys was inspired by my life as an aspiring actress in Los Angeles. It was a difficult, yet exciting time. I experienced many trials and tribulations during my quest for fame and fortune, and it was enough to write a book, literally. The experience was a daunting one, yet very thrilling and rewarding to find that determination within myself to forge ahead in the frightening minefield that is Hollywood. I had the urge to share my experience, and I did. I have no regrets that I never won an Oscar or made it “big”, I feel regrets are a waste of time. However, I had incredible material for a novel.

I just let myself become inspired by many things: life, people, the world, California, New York, traveling to exotic places, romance, sex and adventure. All those interesting things that I fantasize about. I just feel the urge, and I sit down and create my imaginary world. It makes me feel creative, inspired and powerful. I can create my characters to have anything, do anything, and achieve anything I wish them to achieve, do or have. That feeling inspires me. Many other things inspire me – my family, my kids and my friends. I have very creative friends, and come from a very creative family, too. I feel best when I just sit back, relax and breathe, and let life inspire me. Only then, will the inspiration come.

Connect with Lindy on Facebook or Twitter.

Follow Lachesis Publishing on twitter and like our facebook page.

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedin

clipartof.com

Are you more productive in the morning? Or do you find writing late at night to be the best? Do you like to work in a busy coffee shop with lots of buzzing around you or do you need complete solitude? We all have different routines when working and sometimes it takes a while to find what works best for us.

At this stage in my life (at the ripe old age of 45.999999 . . . 😉 I find I’m more productive in the mornings. Especially at this time of year. It’s so much easier to get up early and get stuff done while it’s still quiet, and yet, the sun and light are out as well, keeping me company, so I feel energized. I get lots of work done in the mornings now. And generally do errands and other stuff in the early afternoon then more work in the late afternoon and early evening.

I used to be a night owl. I would stay up all night and work until the wee hours of the morning. Sometimes I still do that – rarely – but I find it really affects me and it takes me a day or two to bounce back and get into my regular routine.

Speaking of routines – I recently read this awesome book called The Power of Habit by Charles Duhiig. In his book, Duhigg explains why habits exist and how they can be changed (for the better). It’s not a self-help book – he explores scientific research and cites examples of routines from corporate America to elite athletes –  but it will help you. So what does The Power of Habit have to do with our writing routines? So much! When I veer off my daily work routine, I don’t feel right. I don’t feel productive and I don’t feel “good inside”. Sticking to a positive work routine or any kind of routine or regimen keeps us focused and goal oriented. That’s important, because as writers, we constantly work on deadlines. Some of us need to have a cup of coffee in the morning or go for a walk after breakfast, or listen to some music. If it works to keep us productive and positive then it’s a good thing.

I found a great blog post from brainpickings.org that lists some famous writers talking about their writing routines. Here are a few of them:

Joan Didion: I need an hour alone before dinner, with a drink, to go over what I’ve done that day. I can’t do it late in the afternoon because I’m too close to it. Also, the drink helps. It removes me from the pages. So I spend this hour taking things out and putting other things in. Then I start the next day by redoing all of what I did the day before, following these evening notes. When I’m really working I don’t like to go out or have anybody to dinner, because then I lose the hour. If I don’t have the hour, and start the next day with just some bad pages and nowhere to go, I’m in low spirits. Another thing I need to do, when I’m near the end of the book, is sleep in the same room with it. That’s one reason I go home to Sacramento to finish things. Somehow the book doesn’t leave you when you’re asleep right next to it. In Sacramento nobody cares if I appear or not. I can just get up and start typing.

Jack Kerouac: The desk in the room, near the bed, with a good light, midnight till dawn, a drink when you get tired, preferably at home, but if you have no home, make a home out of your hotel room or motel room or pad: peace.

Simone de Beauvoir: I’m always in a hurry to get going, though in general I dislike starting the day. I first have tea and then, at about ten o’clock, I get under way and work until one. Then I see my friends and after that, at five o’clock, I go back to work and continue until nine. I have no difficulty in picking up the thread in the afternoon. When you leave, I’ll read the paper or perhaps go shopping. Most often it’s a pleasure to work.

Don DeLillo: I work in the morning at a manual typewriter. I do about four hours and then go running. This helps me shake off one world and enter another. Trees, birds, drizzle — it’s a nice kind of interlude. Then I work again, later afternoon, for two or three hours. Back into book time, which is transparent — you don’t know it’s passing. No snack food or coffee. No cigarettes — I stopped smoking a long time ago. The space is clear, the house is quiet. A writer takes earnest measures to secure his solitude and then finds endless ways to squander it. Looking out the window, reading random entries in the dictionary. To break the spell I look at a photograph of Borges, a great picture sent to me by the Irish writer Colm Tóín. The face of Borges against a dark background — Borges fierce, blind, his nostrils gaping, his skin stretched taut, his mouth amazingly vivid; his mouth looks painted; he’s like a shaman painted for visions, and the whole face has a kind of steely rapture. I’ve read Borges of course, although not nearly all of it, and I don’t know anything about the way he worked — but the photograph shows us a writer who did not waste time at the window or anywhere else. So I’ve tried to make him my guide out of lethargy and drift, into the otherworld of magic, art, and divination.

Ernest Hemingway: When I am working on a book or a story I write every morning as soon after first light as possible. There is no one to disturb you and it is cool or cold and you come to your work and warm as you write. You read what you have written and, as you always stop when you know what is going to happen next, you go on from there. You write until you come to a place where you still have your juice and know what will happen next and you stop and try to live through until the next day when you hit it again. You have started at six in the morning, say, and may go on until noon or be through before that. When you stop you are as empty, and at the same time never empty but filling, as when you have made love to someone you love. Nothing can hurt you, nothing can happen, nothing means anything until the next day when you do it again. It is the wait until the next day that is hard to get through.

So what kind of work routines or habits do you have to get things done?

Have a productive day!

We’ve got plenty of productive authors here at  Lachesis Publishing.

Like our Lachesis Publishing page on facebook. Follow us on twitter.

Joanna D’Angelo is Editor in Chief at Lachesis Publishing Inc. She loves Cinnamon Dolce Lattes, being productive, and sticking to her daily routine.

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedin

Today’s Q and A is with Lachesis Publishing author Alexis D. Craig. Alexis writes sultry and funny contemporary romances (Give Me Shelter and Imminent Danger) featuring the brave men and women in law enforcement.  She also writes super hot erotica featuring sexy cops (Undercover Seduction). By day Alexis is a police dispatcher so she knows her cops!

When did you first realize you wanted to become a writer and why?

It wasn’t a realization so much as something I just did. I enjoyed telling stories, always have. I didn’t really start writing them down consistently until high school. It made it easier to keep track of them. Once I cleared the space out of my head, I made room for more stories. It seemed like a good fit for me.

Describe your favourite place to write?

I actually really like my writing set up now. Super comfy chair, my laptop elevated on a TV tray, facing the muted TV (a habit I picked up in dispatch, I function better if the TV is on but I’m not listening to it), my music playing, my keyboard in my lap, and a dog or three snoring around me. It’s very peaceful.

What would I find on your desk at this very moment?

Lord, it’s a hot mess. I have my laptop, my detached DVR burner, my wireless mouse and keyboard, a red plastic cup, and a pen or two. My mp3 player, charging cords for it and my phone, a few hairbands, and my Lego cheerleader that my husband gave me to keep me going.

What is your tea/coffee beverage of choice when you’re writing?

Normally I’m drinking water with caffeinated cherry Mio in it. I tend to run on caffeine. My other choices are iced tea or diet cherry coke.

What do you love to read?

I’m a romance aficionado from way back. I picked up the bug in middle school and never looked back. I started with contemporary and though I occasionally ventured into historicals, one or two paranormals, I always circled back to contemporaries. Mostly romantic suspense, the spicier the better, if there’s sex and a stack of bodies, I’m definitely there.

What is some good advice you can give to an emerging writer?

Believe in yourself and keep trying, especially in the face of rejection. It’s not personal, regardless of how it feels in the moment. Give yourself a day to be pissed about it, maybe less, then carry on. I might even go so far as to say “plan for rejection.” If Plan A doesn’t work, you need to be able to pull the trigger on Plan B as soon as you can. It helps to know what Plan B is before you need it.

What do you do after you finish a book? Do you celebrate or take a nap?

Usually I celebrate a little bit. Usually it’s the middle of the night and I’m the only creature awake in the house, so I have to celebrate quietly and then I go to bed (I keep junkie hours when I’m working on a story). Next day I start at the beginning and commence the first round of clean up.

You’ve written a few books for Lachesis Publishing – two romantic suspenses and one erotica anthology. Tell us about them?

Imminent Danger, my debut novel, came out of me being injured. I was angry and hobbled, on a cane and unhappy about it. That’s how I got the idea for the opening of the book. The story was entirely fictional and my first attempt at plotting vs pantsing. It worked out well, but I learned that a hybrid method works the best for me. I get too detail oriented sometimes, and that can unnecessarily hinder the process.

Give Me Shelter was done with a more ‘seat of your pants’ approach to plotting. It was definitely a departure from my normal MO, with three time frames and storylines woven together. I’m very proud of the way it finally came together. Eli, Bex, Violet, Zoe, and AR are definitely close to my heart.

Undercover Seduction was a collection of stories and snippets that really didn’t lend themselves to anything longer. They were quick scenes of hot encounters, including my first menage on paper. The title of Rule Number Seven came from a Christian Kane song lyric, “rule number seven says ‘don’t touch the women, but they can grab whatever they want to.'” That pretty much encompassed the whole vibe of that story.

You clearly love writing sexy stuff. Other than the obvious – what do you like about writing hot reads?

It’s something I love to read,  and when it’s done well, it definitely adds to the story overall. It’s never just sex for the sake of sex, it has to be germane to the story, because otherwise it’s just porn. I don’t write with the sex scenes in mind, I just let them run wild when they blossom within the story. What are you working on next?

I have a set of books coming out next year, The Ex File in early February, and its companion piece, Dead and Disorderly in late May. Both are set in Indianapolis, like Imminent Danger,, and based around fictional members of IMPD.

Additionally, I have written a follow up to Give Me Shelter, called Bulletproof Princess. Its focus is a side character from GMS, U.S. Marshal Mack Jefferson. Eli refers to him as a ‘ginger git from Mesa’. He gets more than he bargained for when he’s pulled into a protection detail of country megastar Cassie Witt. She witnesses a murder and goes on the run from a highly skilled assassin, but how do you hide celebrity? That was the first of several problems as their precarious situation serves as the backdrop for their growing passions.

Connect with Alexis D. Craig on her web site and her facebook page and twitter.

Like our Lachesis Publishing page on facebook. Follow us on twitter.