book sale, Historical Paranormal

Luscious Historical Romances Written by Talented, Award-Winning Authors

Guess what? All of our Lachesis Publishing historical romances are on sale for only $.99 Cents! Patricia Grasso, JoMarie DeGioia, Patricia Barletta and Beverly Adam. Luscious and compelling historical romances just for you to enjoy!
IT’S THE LACHESIS PUBLISHING ANNIVERSARY SALE! EVERY SINGLE EBOOK IS $.99 CENTS!

Click on this link and start shopping!

So, if you haven’t already purchased one of our yummy mysteries, or beautiful romances, or riveting sci-fi reads, or compelling paranormals, or engaging YAs, or uplifting women’s fiction, do it now. Do it this month. Do it right here, while the price is right!

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BOOK OF THE WEEK: Dragon’s Fall – Rise of the Scarlet Order by David Lee Summers

Three vampires (2)

The Lachesis Publishing Book of the Week is DRAGON’S FALL – RISE OF THE SCARLET ORDER by David Lee Summers.

What it’s about:

Three vampyrs. Three lives. Three intertwining stories.

Bearing the guilt of destroying the holiest of books after becoming a vampyr, the Dragon, Lord Desmond, searches the world for lost knowledge, but instead, discovers truth in love.

Born a slave in Ancient Greece, Alexandra craves freedom above all else, until a vampyr sets her free, but then, she must pay the highest price of all . . . her human soul.

An assassin who lives in the shadows, Roquelaure is cloaked even from himself, until he discovers the power of friendship and loyalty.

Three vampyrs, traveling the world by moonlight—one woman and two men who forge a bond made in love and blood. Together they form a band of mercenaries called the Scarlet Order, and recruit others who are like them. Their mission is to protect kings and emperors against marauders, invaders, rogue vampyrs, and their ultimate nemesis—Vlad the Impaler.

Connect with David Lee Summers. online via facebook and twitter, and check out his web site.

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BOOK OF THE WEEK: Happy New Release Day! Moon Shadow by Patricia Barletta #romance #historical #paranormal

 

The LACHESIS PUBLISHING BOOK OF THE WEEK is the breathtaking historical paranormal romance MOON SHADOW by Patricia Barletta.

Get it at amazonbarnes and noblekobo, and iBooks. You can also get it right here at Lachesis Publishing (all formats) 

It’s the second book in a compelling new series called the Auriano Curse. A hero and heroine you will absolutely love for their courage and passion. Patricia’s first book in this series MOON DARK has recently won the Colorado Romance Writers Award of Excellence as well as the Gail Wilson Award of Excellence – Southern Magic.

What It’s About:

Solange Delacroix is a woman of dark secrets. She steals for Le Chacal, the King of Thieves, and is the mistress of the powerful and cruel Marquis de Vernoux. Orphaned as a child, along with her younger brother Gide, her life revolves around protecting him and surviving among cut-throat killers and power-hungry schemers in post-revolutionary Paris. But everything changes when she steals a moonstone pendant from the handsome Duke of Auriano.

Antonio D’Este, Duke of Auriano harbors his own secrets. Cursed by the evil sorceress Nulkana, he’s condemned to live half his life as Shadow. When a highwayman ambushes him and steals the magical moonstone that curbs the devastating effects of his family’s curse, he is determined to find the thief and take back what is his. Attending a salon in Paris run by the ravishing Madame de Volonté, Solange’s alias, he realizes she is the “boy” thief who stole from him. His need for revenge becomes entwined with desire for this beautiful woman.

Antonio and Solange come together in a dangerous dance of secrets, thievery, and passion. Hounded by the evil Nulkana, threatened by the ruthless King of Thieves, menaced by the cruel Marquis de Vernoux, their safety hangs in a precarious balance. Antonio seeks a piece of the magical Sphere of Astarte that will end his curse. Solange seeks freedom for herself and her brother. But when their quests turn deadly, will their love help them survive?

Find out more about Patricia Barletta and her books on her website: www.patriciabarletta.com.

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BOOK OF THE WEEK, Dark Paranormal, Historical Paranormal, horror fiction, paranormal

Book of the Week: Dragon’s Fall – Rise of the Scarlet Order by David Lee Summers #amreading #paranormal #horror

Three vampires (2)

The Lachesis Publishing Book of the Week is DRAGON’S FALL – RISE OF THE SCARLET ORDER by David Lee Summers.

What it’s about:

Three vampyrs. Three lives. Three intertwining stories.

Bearing the guilt of destroying the holiest of books after becoming a vampyr, the Dragon, Lord Desmond, searches the world for lost knowledge, but instead, discovers truth in love.

Born a slave in Ancient Greece, Alexandra craves freedom above all else, until a vampyr sets her free, but then, she must pay the highest price of all . . . her human soul.

An assassin who lives in the shadows, Roquelaure is cloaked even from himself, until he discovers the power of friendship and loyalty.

Three vampyrs, traveling the world by moonlight—one woman and two men who forge a bond made in love and blood. Together they form a band of mercenaries called the Scarlet Order, and recruit others who are like them. Their mission is to protect kings and emperors against marauders, invaders, rogue vampyrs, and their ultimate nemesis—Vlad the Impaler.

Connect with David Lee Summers. online via facebook and twitter, and check out his web site.

Like our Lachesis Publishing page on facebook.
Follow Lachesis Publishing on twitter.

 

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DEAL OF THE WEEK: MOON DARK by Patricia Barletta #amreading #romance #historical #paranormal

Moon Dark 453 x 680Our DEAL OF THE WEEK is the breathtaking historical romance (with paranormal elements) MOON DARK by Patricia Barletta.

Get it for .99 cents at amazon, barnes and noble, kobo, and iBooks. You can also get it right here at Lachesis Publishing (all formats) for .99 cents.

 

It’s the first book in an exciting, and romantic new series called the Auriano Curse. You will love this book as much as I do. Beautifully written and full of steamy romance, adventure, and of course a hero and heroine who are perfectly matched, MOON DARK has recently won the Colorado Romance Writers Award of Excellence. 2016-AOE-winner-Paranormal-300x300

 

What It’s About:

Lady Sabrina Dunfield is desperate. Widowed and destitute, she must rely on the dubious benevolence of her secretive uncle, an art collector living in Venice. Determined to make her way and provide for her young son, Sabrina is forced to take on clandestine and dangerous errands for her tyrannical relative. But when a mysterious shadow man saves her from an assassin’s blade, she knows she must do everything in her power to keep her son safe.

Alessandro D’Este, Prince of Auriano, is cursed. Doomed to live a life half in shadow, he is determined to free himself and his family from the evil that stalks them. When Alessandro saves the English woman’s life, he is captivated by her beauty and shocked at her ability to touch him in his shadowy form.

When Sabrina meets Alessandro in his human form, heady attraction sparks between them. She has no idea he is her shadowy savior, and she wonders what her life might be like with this charismatic man. Alessandro has never met a woman who affects him this way. Although life has taught him to trust only family, Sabrina might be the key that could deliver him from the diabolical darkness.

 

Find out more about Patricia Barletta and her books on her website: www.patriciabarletta.com.

Connect with Patricia Barletta on facebook: Patricia Barletta on facebook

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Let your imagination be your travel guide by Patricia Barletta #amwriting #writingcraft

Venice, Italy was captured by Patricia Barletta's imagination before she captured this photo.
Venice, Italy was captured by Patricia Barletta’s imagination before she captured this photo.

Where does your story take place? In a galaxy far, far away? Or maybe in an anthill teeming with tiny creatures? No matter where you’ve chosen to place your characters, they have to be someplace. The setting of a story is much more than logistics – making sure a character doesn’t trip over a table or walk out a door that wasn’t there before. Setting is also a state of mind. We think one way if we’re on a busy city street in the summer and another if we’re trudging through the mountains in the middle of a blizzard. Characters in a story should, too. What if you’ve never experienced either of those conditions, but one or the other is important to the tale you want to tell? What if you want to set your story in a place where you’ve never been? How do you do that and make it authentic?

Image: www.ispirando.it
Image: www.ispirando.it

My book, Moon Dark, is set in Venice, Italy, in 1797. I’d never been to Italy when I decided to set my story there, and I certainly couldn’t time-travel back to the late eighteenth century. I knew a little bit about the city, that it had canals and gondolas, and a celebration called Carnevale, but not much else. So I had to do some serious research about the physical place, as well as its history and customs.

The first sources I went to were travel guides. These are great for giving the layout of a place, as well as the tourist attractions like historical sites, which were in everyday use in my historical story. Most have detailed street maps. Some show the floor plans and interiors of important buildings, and some others give details that only the natives know. This type of information is important if you want your characters to appear like they belong where you’ve put them.

Image: Merlin TV series http://www.bbc.co.uk
Image: Merlin TV series http://www.bbc.co.uk

Next, my research took me to political histories of Venice. Even if you’re writing a story set in the present, a little knowledge of the setting’s history helps fill in background details, because no one lives in a vacuum. No matter who or what your character is, he/she/it should know or want to know something about the past, whether immediate or distant, because it impacts the present. In my case, I discovered that Venice has a long history of keeping secrets and protecting herself by using spies, called capo neri. Putting them in my story added another layer of danger and suspense.

One of Canaletto's paintings of Venice Image: www.telegraph.co.uk
One of Canaletto’s paintings of Venice Image: www.telegraph.co.uk

Every region of the world has its own rules of conduct, and we interact with each other differently now than we did in the past. I needed to discover how the Venetians lived their lives and where they slept. I delved into social histories, which explained customs and mores of the time. Since the buildings in Venice are unique because they have entrances which open directly onto the canals, I looked at books on architecture. Fortunately, at the time my story is set, landscape painting was the hot fad, and Canaletto was its master in Venice, so I was able to look at his artwork reproduced in books that showed scenes of the city. For stories set in the modern era, photography books work well. And of course there’s the app, Google Earth.

51EW04XQBWLI happened to find a memoir written by a Venetian about his ancestor who lived at the time of my story, which gave me fabulous details about Venice and her inhabitants. Journals, travelogues, and newspapers are some other good resources for discovering what the people of a time and place are thinking about. Your characters may be focused on the action in your story, but other stuff is going on around them.

The next stop in my research journey took me to fashion books, because people move differently in corsets and petticoats and waistcoats and breeches than they do in tee shirts and jeans. Besides, readers of romance want to know what the characters in a story are wearing. Finally, cookbooks reveal how and what people from a specific region eat. You are what you eat, right? And don’t forget to check the weather. It’s not sunny and seventy-two degrees everywhere all the time. You can get details about conditions at different times of the year online. You can even find out the specific date the moon was full centuries ago.

Patricia Barletta (right) with her friend enjoying Venice.
Patricia Barletta (right) with her friend enjoying Venice.

Serendipity plays a big role in research. I’ve tripped over quite a few interesting details that I’ve used in my stories to make my characters and settings more authentic. Once you get the sense of a place, you can extrapolate and let your imagination run wild. I don’t think there ever was a Canale di l’Ombres (Canal of Shadows) in the real city of Venice, but I put one there.

I finally got to travel to Italy last year and see Venice. It was everything I imagined – magical and mysterious and beautiful. And I was thrilled to discover that a lot of my descriptions matched the actual sites. But I can’t decide which was more fun: creating it in my imagination or riding through its canals and walking its alleys.

Moon Dark
Moon Dark

Patricia Barletta writes historical romance with paranormal elements. Her first release with Lachesis Publishing is MOON DARK and it’s the first in a new and exciting series called the AURIANO CURSE SERIES. You can buy it here at Lachesis Publishing or on amazon, kobo, Barnes and Noble.

Find out more about Patricia Barletta and her books on her website: www.patriciabarletta.com.

Connect with Patricia Barletta on facebook: Patricia Barletta on facebook

Like our Lachesis Publishing page on facebook.
Follow Lachesis Publishing on twitter.

 

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My Top Five Favorite Romances for Valentine’s Day by Patricia Barletta (romance author)

Screen Shot 2016-02-09 at 12.04.38 PMEveryone has their own favorite romances, and everyone has their own favorite romance genres. For me, it’s historical romance. There’s something about reading a love story set in the past that adds a bit more fantasy and glamor. I’ve always been fascinated by history, not so much the political side, but the sociological side, learning how people actually lived long ago. The swish of silk petticoats, the flash of a steel blade, and the soft shadows of candlelight make my imagination run wild. I’m a pushover for a hunk in tight breeches and boots. Reading and writing about two people falling in love in a historical setting just seems to fit. So, in honor of Valentine’s Day, I’ve decided to share five of my all-time favorite historical romances, and not in any particular order.

52Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen. How can you not fall in love with Mr. Darcy, the wealthy, handsome, shy and pompous, but ultimately honorable catch for all the single women of the neighborhood? The book wasn’t written as a historical novel, so the language and social mores are contemporary to Austen (which also makes it a good research tool for writers). Lizzie’s strength of character could make even twenty-first century women stand up and cheer. And Darcy’s desire to protect her family’s reputation despite their ditzyness and stupidity would make any woman melt. No wonder it’s still so popular after two centuries.

6459042-MMoonstruck Madness by Laurie McBain. Lady Sabrina Verrick turns highwayman in order to support her family and ensure that her younger brother grows up to inherit his Scottish title after they are forced to flee the British. But when she robs the devilishly handsome Lucien, Duke of Camareigh, she realizes she has twisted Satan’s tail, for he won’t rest until he’s caught the thief. I liked that Sabrina is a woman who defies society’s rules to fight for what she loves. And Lucien learns some valuable lessons from the sweet temptress who steals more than his jewels.

Shanna-1Shanna by Kathleen Woodiwiss. Although I loved Woodiwiss’s The Flame and the Flower, I think Shanna is my favorite of all her novels. It’s a tale of a bold young woman who weds a prisoner of Newgate in order to free herself from the dictates of her father: find an aristocrat to wed or he would find one for her. When she abandons the hunky convict Ruark to the gallows, she doesn’t expect him to escape and come after her to demand his marital rights. The story starts in London, but most of the chase takes place on a Carribean island, and includes swashbuckling pirates, tropical seas, and sultry nights. Oh my!

692959Silk and Shadows by MaryJo Putney. Mysterious, devastatingly handsome, incredibly wealthy Peregrine (whose real name is Mikhail) has come to London from an exotic land to seek revenge for a wrong done to him twenty-five years ago when he was a boy of ten. I loved this hero from the first page. Lady Sara St. James, already betrothed, is part of his plan, for the man to whom she is promised is Peregine’s mark. But Sara is no retiring young miss, for she is intelligent and educated and older than most single women looking to marry. Her high principles and Peregrine’s lack of them in his pursuit for revenge make for a rousing, sensuous read.

3052626Highland Velvet by Jude Devereaux. Nineteen-year-old Bronwyn MacArran is the leader of her Scottish clan. When she is promised to a stranger by the English king, he is four days late for the wedding, so she sets her sights on another handsome face. But the knight Stephen Montgomery, her intended, doesn’t like losing what he’s been promised, so he jousts for her and wins, only to have Bronwyn hate him for winning, for being English, . . . and for being a man. It’s the Scots against the English, both out on the moors and in the bedroom, with a dash of intrigue and underhanded conniving thrown in. I loved Bronwyn’s feistiness, and Stephen is an honorable medieval knight to die for.

There are so many great historical romances out there, and fabulous authors who write them, like Eileen Dryer, Shana Abé, Laura Kinsale, Judith McNaught, Karen Robards, Hannah Howell, Laura Navarre, Patricia Grasso, Loretta Chase, and Joanna Shupe, just to name a few. I had a really hard time narrowing down my list to just five, so I went back to my keeper shelf, where I put books before the Kindle was even a spark in Amazon’s eye, and before Jeff Bezos came up with the idea to sell books online. Even before there was the internet. But some stories are timeless.

Moon Dark
Moon Dark

Here’s a disclaimer: Some of these roguish heroes aren’t politically correct. Except for P&P, the romances were written during the late seventies, eighties, and early nineties, when romance readers had different expectations. So if you pick up one of these stories, keep that in mind. And get lost in the passions of the past. Happy reading!

Patricia Barletta writes historical romance with paranormal elements. Her first release with Lachesis Publishing is MOON DARK and it’s the first in a new and exciting series called the AURIANO CURSE SERIES. You can buy it here at Lachesis Publishing or on amazon, kobo, Barnes and Noble.

Find out more about Patricia Barletta and her books on her website: www.patriciabarletta.com.

Connect with Patricia Barletta on facebook: Patricia Barletta on facebook

Like our Lachesis Publishing page on facebook.
Follow Lachesis Publishing on twitter.

 

 

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What Inspired Me To Become A Writer? by Patricia Barletta (historical romance author)

Image: ovenbakedtradition.com
Image: ovenbakedtradition.com

I haven’t always been a writer. There was a period of time in my early years when being a writer wasn’t even a thought in my head. I aspired to be a fairy princess or a ballerina. But I loved to read, and stories transported me to other places where I could be anything I wanted.

The first piece of fiction I wrote was in fifth grade, when we had to write an essay about how we had named our pet. My family had a dog, Skippy, and he was named that just because we all liked the name. Pretty boring story. But I made up a tale of Skippy running up and down the hallway in my house, looking like he skipped. I got an A on that essay, and felt a little guilty because, well, it wasn’t a true story. Deep down, I was surprised that my teacher hadn’t seen through my deception, and maybe a little bit pleased, too.

Image: disney.wikia.com
Image: disney.wikia.com

When I reached junior

Image: www.dailymail.co.uk
Image: www.dailymail.co.uk

high, I started writing fan fiction. The TV show,The Wonderful World of Color, produced by Walt Disney, ran a series about the American Revolutionary War hero, Francis Marion, nicknamed the Swamp Fox. My imagination took off, and I wrote a story about my own fictional hero, a teen-aged Revolutionary spy and the young lady he recruits to help him. Then when I was in high school, The Beatles were the hottest thing since humans discovered fire, so I wrote a story about an American girl who meets them on their first U.S. tour and becomes Paul McCartney‘s girlfriend. It was all cheesy, but my friends loved it and clamored for more. I was shocked. I could actually write something that people wanted to read!

15084-180x3002435000-1After high school, college and marriage and kids made me put down my pen for a while. Then I read Rosemary Rogers’s Sweet Savage Love and Kathleen Woodiwiss’s The Flame and the Flower. Rogers’s and Woodiwiss’s heroes were hot and dangerous, and I loved the way their heroines stood up to them. I was hooked on historical romances, but more than that, I knew I could write one. I was inspired to write my own. Nine years later, my first historical romance, Ecstasy’s Gamble, was published under my pen name, Amy Christopher.

Moon Dark
Moon Dark

I’m writing under my own name now, and writing about magic, and dark heroes and feisty heroines who live in the past. It’s been a long road between that first fifth-grade essay and my newest release, Moon Dark, Book 1 Auriano Curse Series. The hero, Alessandro, Prince of Auriano, is much more complex than my dog, Skippy, and quite a bit sexier, too. And the heroine, Sabrina, knows just how to push his buttons. So there are sparks and fireworks and some magical stuff. I hope you visit Moon Dark and get to meet them.

Find out more about Patricia Barletta and her books on her website: www.patriciabarletta.com.

Connect with Patricia Barletta on facebook: Patricia Barletta on facebook

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How does a YA author connect with YA readers? by Richard Blackburn

large

Image; www.gettyimages.com.au
Image; www.gettyimages.com.au

I really enjoy giving talks to students. I’ve been invited into scores of high schools because my three published books have been accepted for the New South Wales Premier’s Reading Challenge (PRC). This is a popular initiative in Australian States, where students sign up each year to read a certain number of books and receive certificates if they attain set goals. Their teachers question them before they submit their claim for a certificate, to make sure they have actually done the reading. The books, for the New South Wales Challenge, are set out in lists for each age group but it is not easy for an author to have a book accepted by the PRC committee. It cannot be self-published and must adhere to their standards of language, content and things like that. It also must be well written.

Image: stratfordlibrary.org
Image: stratfordlibrary.org

So, very early in my writing career, I made the conscious decision that I would write for teens and early twenty year olds (even though I have had ‘fanmail’ from youngsters up to eighty years of age). I didn’t read when I was younger. There were no books in my house. My parent were members of the local library but the few times I was taken there I had to sit on a hard wooden bench and not say a word. I’m so happy that things have changed and modern libraries encourage young readers and invite authors like me to give talks to the young readers’ groups.

But I’m getting off my original subject, which is the joys of giving talks to young writers. I always discuss the students’ needs with their teacher and tailor my talk to suit their requirements, but if I have a free hand, I like to talk about writing historical adventure stories.

I tell them that it is possible to gloss over facts and use generalities, and you could still tell an exciting tale, but if you want to sound professional and take your reader into the past with you, beware. You have to do a lot of research. If you get one thing wrong, there are re-enactment groups out there who look upon the past with almost religious zeal. Write anything wrong and they will want to crucify you!

Image: www.todayifoundout.com
Image: www.todayifoundout.com

So where are these pitfalls? The first is to think that something very normal to us today was always like that. Take sitting down to a meal. You might think a family in medieval times would have plates, knives, forks and spoons on the table. Wrong. Most peasants carried a knife at their belt at all times. They might need to cut honeysuckle vine to make rope or peel bark from a willow tree to crush to make a pain killer. So they would not need a knife supplied at meal times. And forks were not used in Europe until the eighteenth century. In England, the Royal Navy would not let sailors use forks even into the eighteen hundreds; they said it was effeminate!

Image: cookit.e2bn.org
Image: cookit.e2bn.org

And plates weren’t used either. At a noble family’s table, four day old rye bread would be cut by the panter. No, not the bloke who had trouble breathing. French was the main language used in England for about three hundred years after the Norman invasion, and the French for bread is pain. So this servant’s job was to cut pieces of stale bread so the noble family and their guests could use them as plates. The higher you were up the social ladder, the more ‘trenchers’ (from the French tranchier – to cut) you were given. So the Lord didn’t have to have his desserts on the piece of bread now soaked in cold, greasy gravy but the knight might have to.

613z0qgvmRL._SX319_BO1,204,203,200_I try to make my talk as amusing or gruesome as possible, so I like to quote from The Boke of Karuying (The Book of Carving) by Wynkyn de Worde. In the section on good manners, he talks about table manners. It is not polite, he says, to spit on the tablecloth or over it. Also he suggests not to blow your nose on it, either, which, of course, you might never have thought of. He discourages spitting a long way but says the polite thing to do is cover your mouth with your hand and spit on the floor near your chair. With many noblemen having at least fifty people to each meal, I wouldn’t like to be the servant who had to wash the floor after each meal.

Image; www.wickedhappyfuntime.com
Image; www.wickedhappyfuntime.com

And the choice of words used in your historical novel is important. If a person is speaking in the fourteenth century, he wouldn’t use modern expressions. There are also many words that just weren’t invented then. The word POSH comes from the letters chalked on luggage of wealthy people travelling to India in the days of the Raj. The cabins on the port side of the boat would be shady therefore cooler going to India and the starboard ones cooler coming back. So the mnemonic POSH, for Port out, Starboard home, was used. Flash in the pan, going off ‘half cock’ were expressions based on the use of the musket, a weapon not invented until after the period of my books. But a ‘cock up’ did happen in those days. An arrow usually has three feathers, with one of them sticking straight out of the shaft (the cock feather) and the others at an angle to the nock (the notch for the bow string). If you shoot the arrow with the cock feather on the side of the bow, it will send the arrow off course, thereby causing a ‘cock up’.

Image: www.reddit.com
Image: www.reddit.com

There are so many more aspects of medieval life that differ from today. The food they ate and the fact that most of them drank beer all the time. Students are usually amazed to find out that part of a servant’s wage was ‘small beer’ and a page boy would receive half the beer ration given to an adult. Then there are the clothes they wore. Kids like to hear how King Edward III ordered his soldiers to pad their codpieces when fighting the French, to look more manly. I like to take along a chain mail joupon and helmet and invite students to put them on, so they could feel the weight and try to imagine what it would be like to fight a battle dressed in armor.

Image: www.williamcowley.co.uk
Image: www.williamcowley.co.uk

And when I’m visiting England, I visit as many castles and stately homes as possible. Actually seeing the rooms used by nobility and the things they used in daily life is very interesting to me. Unfortunately I’ve never found a medieval hut still preserved, with the artifacts of the poorer people, but I read as many contemporary books and documents as I can find and search for paintings of the period. As I tell the students I talk to, it took days to clean a lamb’s skin and stretch it out on tenter hooks to make parchment. Each skin would make about eight pages which would be scored with feint lines using a pen knife; the tool used to sharpen the goose feather used to write with. And the best ink was made by finding oak apples with wasp holes in them. These would be crushed with a copper oxide and thickened with gum Arabic for the best writing consistency. So, having gone to all this trouble to make the materials, very few authors would waste their time writing about common people, who couldn’t read anyway.
DAWN OF THE SENTINEL COVER
Return of the Sentinel Book 2 Guardians of the Gate by Richard BlackburnSo I put a lot of work into making my writing as close to the real life of those days as possible. I hope my readers enjoy the results of my labors because I’ve really enjoyed doing it.

Richard Blackburn has written a three-book YA time travel/adventure series for Lachesis Publishing, called Guardians of the Gate, featuring a university student who travels back to Medieval England only to discover she has some amazing powers she never knew she had. Book 1 Dawn of the Sentinel and Book 2, Return of the Sentinel, are out now. Book 3: The Gatekeeper Rises will be out in 2016. You can get both books for only .99 cents right here at Lachesis Publishing during our Black Friday/Cyber Monday ebook sale! 

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Celebrate Samhain with a Paranormal Romance about a Pagan Healer by Teri Barnett (paranormal romance author)

image: jinxmim.deviantart.com
image: jinxmim.deviantart.com

Halloween. All Hallow’s Eve. Eve of All Saints. Samhain.

All these names for one night, but it’s the last one which touches me most. Sow-wen. Its Celtic origins mark it as the original name for what we’ve come to call Halloween. For me, the name conjures images of Priestesses and their Woodsmen consorts, dancing with abandon between twin bonfires. Additional fires burn throughout the hillsides for protection and to light the darkness. The harvest is over and another cycle is complete. The Celtic New Year has begun and the Crone begins her transformational journey toward the Spring Maiden.

pagan-fireWhen I first started researching my historical/paranormal/romance novel, PAGAN FIRE, I dove headfirst into ancient Celtic ceremony and traditions. The lure of ritual touched me at a cellular level and I knew I had been there with those women of long ago. This knowledge drew me to apprentice – and later create – my own priestess circles where I invite women to reconnect to the time when our bodies were in tune with the turning of the seasons.

The Autumnal Equinox passes and Samhain looms. The Wise Woman turns inward.

The underworld beckons.

The Goddesses of Shadow extend their thin, bony hands and invite us to enter their realm . . . Inanna, Hecate, Persephone, Nephthys . . . it matters not what you name her, these are all faces of the same energy. Collectively, they call us to die to old ways of living that we might be reborn at the Vernal Equinox. Shiny. Pink. New. Ready to live again with knowledge accrued from the inner reflection of our own wintry death.

image: nightt-angell.deviantart.com
image: nightt-angell.deviantart.com

These Goddesses teach us that dying is not the end, it’s simply a turning of the page on this earthly journey. Samhain marks this time as a night where the veil is the thinnest between this world and the next. It’s the place of ‘in-between’ when we might touch those who have crossed the bridge before us.

Samhain ritual inspires us to pay our respects to the dead. Place apples or other fruit near the front door for them. Light a fire that they may better see their path (or place carved and lit pumpkins in your window, though turnips were the original option!). Visit a graveyard, sit amongst the headstones, and keep the spirits company. Hold a Dumb Dinner in remembrance of your ancestors. Dumb meaning you don’t speak during the meal as a way of honoring the dead (this works out wonderfully as a pitch-in to include friends and family).

image: cimiarte.com
image: cimiarte.com

Or, simply sit quietly and reflect on those who went before you. Send them love and light on their journey. You might also ask them for messages, but be sure to light candles and surround yourself with a circle of salt first. While the point of all this is to honor and appreciate the dead, a little protection never hurts when inviting spirits into your world.

image: celticanamcara.blogspot.com
image: celticanamcara.blogspot.com

And, if you’re called, dance! Remember, Samhain is a celebration, not a mourning!

Teri Barnett writes historical, paranormal, and time travel romance. You can purchase her books  Through the Mists of Time, Shadow Dreams, and Pagan Fire at Lachesis Publishing. or you can purchase Teri’s books on amazon, and Barnes and Noble.

Connect with Teri Barnett online via facebook and twitter, and check out her web site.

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